Home and Garden Digest, Sept. 04, 2015: Learn to make doughnuts at Love Apple … – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Home and Garden Digest, Sept. 04, 2015: Learn to make doughnuts at Love Apple
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Contributed Odontoglossum, first named in 1816 by Karl Sigismund Kunth, is a genus of about 100 orchids. They originate in Colombia. They will be a topic of discussion at the Sept. 5 meeting of the Santa Cruz Orchid Society at 7:30 p.m. at the Live Oak …

Quick Bites: Aug. 26, 2015: Time is now to register for apple-pie contest – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Quick Bites: Aug. 26, 2015: Time is now to register for apple-pie contest
Santa Cruz Sentinel
… and appetizer reception at the on-campus organic farm and garden. The sit-down dinner is the inaugural public event inside the newly completed barn that will become the headquarters of the UCSC Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems.

Ecotourism project in the works for Green Island – Wadena Pioneer Journal


Wadena Pioneer Journal

Ecotourism project in the works for Green Island
Wadena Pioneer Journal
It has agroforestry projects such as a pine plantation, several small apple orchards, currant beds, native and domesticated fruit trials, a small seedling nursery, carbon sequestration and carbon credit sale. Wildlife enhancements at Green Island

Neuston: A relevant trophic resource for apple snails?

Publication date: Available online 7 April 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Lucía Saveanu , Pablo R. Martín
Apple snails are known for the strong impacts they provoke in wetlands and aquatic crops by their macrophytophagous habits. Interestingly, they are able to persist after they have eradicated most palatable aquatic macrophytes in the invaded wetlands. Pedal surface collecting is a distinctive mechanism that apple snails use to capture materials in the water surface. We were interested in knowing the relevance of neuston, the organisms associated with the air-water interface, as an alternative trophic resource. Using the invasive Pomacea canaliculata as a model, our experiments with simulated trophic resources in the laboratory showed that neuston is highly consumed even in the presence of abundant palatable macrophytes. P. canaliculata was able to grow efficiently using neuston as an alternative trophic resource both under laboratory and natural conditions. Neuston probably plays a relevant role specially when other trophic resources are inedible or absent or have been depleted by apple snails. Pedal surface collecting probably evolved in apple snails as an adaptation to cope with fluctuating trophic resources.

Perma-planning: Workshop held for permaculture park – Marquette Mining Journal

Perma-planning: Workshop held for permaculture park
Marquette Mining Journal
MARQUETTE – Sometime down the road, you could see apples, pears, blueberries and currants growing in the Chocolay Permaculture Park. Wednesday marked the first workshop, with field days also planned, for the proposed park located on 14 acres of …

Hundreds vow to protect PH’s biggest marine protected area – Rappler


Rappler

Hundreds vow to protect PH's biggest marine protected area
Rappler
The rest will be multiple use zones where people will be allowed to live and pursue "sustainable resource use" – agroforestry, establishment of fish corrals, fish cages, fish pens and seaweed farming. Despite disagreements and unresolved issues

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It’s winter, but Maine farmers aren’t slacking off – Press Herald


Press Herald

It's winter, but Maine farmers aren't slacking off
Press Herald
Apple expert John Bunker will give a talk, Mark Fulford a class on grafting and there will be workshops on permaculture, organic orcharding, seed saving and more. Sponsored by MOFGA, the Maine Tree Crop Alliance and Fedco, it will also offer the chance

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Planting trees can address erosion of valuable topsoil – Farmers Guardian

Planting trees can address erosion of valuable topsoil
Farmers Guardian
He said: “Since integrating apple trees in rows within my arable rotation of wheat, barley, clover and vegetables, my farm has established the largest agroforestry system in the UK. What's great is only 8 per cent of the land area has been used for

FREE Access to Permaculture Magazine This Weekend Via ByPlace – Permaculture Magazine


Permaculture Magazine

FREE Access to Permaculture Magazine This Weekend Via ByPlace
Permaculture Magazine
(ByPlace is currently only available for Apple users.) This is the first time we are using this and would love to hear from people who use it over the weekend. For more information about the convergence visit HERE. Permaculture magazine will also have

Organic farming conference at UMass focuses on climate change – GazetteNET

Organic farming conference at UMass focuses on climate change
GazetteNET
A workshop led by Connor Stedman of Montague, who works as an agroforestry specialist for AppleSeed Permaculture LLC in Hudson, New York, focused on what he called “carbon farming.” Reducing carbon emissions is very important to addressing …

and more »

Northeast Organic Farming Association conference at UMass focuses on climate … – GazetteNET

Northeast Organic Farming Association conference at UMass focuses on climate
GazetteNET
A workshop led Connor Stedman of Montague, who works as an agroforestry specialist for AppleSeed Permaculture LLC in Hudson, New York, focused on what he called “carbon farming.” Reducing carbon emissions is very important to addressing climate …

and more »

Viola farmer committed to restoring the land – Appleton Post Crescent

Viola farmer committed to restoring the land
Appleton Post Crescent
Educated in forest ecology, he is the CEO of Forest Agriculture Enterprises, author of a book on reclamation agriculture and operator of New Forest Farm, one of the first profitable agroforestry projects in Wisconsin. He set to work planting trees
Farmer committed to restoring the land Journal Times



all 8 news articles »

Embrace the Change – Live Conference – Permaculture Magazine


Permaculture Magazine

Embrace the Change – Live Conference
Permaculture Magazine
Please help us to continue to post inspiring, practical and cutting edge features online for free by SUBSCRIBING to Permaculture – download a FREE sample issue and try before you buy. Also available as a digital subscription (for just £10) and Apple

Rob Hopkins’ Letter to BBC Slams Climate Denier Nigel Lawson – Permaculture Magazine

Rob Hopkins' Letter to BBC Slams Climate Denier Nigel Lawson
Permaculture Magazine
Want to find out more? SUBSCRIBE to Permaculture magazine and get a quarterly dose of practical inspiration. Or download a FREE sample issue and try before you buy. Also available as a digital subscription (for just £10) and Apple and Android devices.

Government bares project to commercialize Apayao’s indigenous fruit – Business Mirror

Government bares project to commercialize Apayao's indigenous fruit
Business Mirror
lanzones, rambutan, pineapple, mangosteen, coconut and, santol, among others. The BAR statement of January 14 said the government is envisioning the province as “the prime 'Agroforestry Center in the North.'” PLG_ITPSOCIALBUTTONS_SUBMIT 

Forget Organic: This Farmer Has 100 Types Of Fruit Trees In His Permaculture … – Co.Exist

Forget Organic: This Farmer Has 100 Types Of Fruit Trees In His Permaculture
Co.Exist
At Miracle Farms, one farmer is on a mission to show the world that permaculture–a food production system that models itself on the natural world–can work on a commercial scale. What's the most environmentally-friendly way to grow an apple? For most 

Pome Fruit Weekend Intensive

Title: Pome Fruit Weekend Intensive
Location: Alan Chadwick Garden, UC Santa Cruz
Description: Join us on February 8-9 from 10 am – 4 pm at UCSC’s Alan Chadwick Garden for a weekend devoted to pome fruits (focus on apples and pears).Learn how to select appropriate pome tree varieties and planting sites; choose and use the right tools; prepare the planting hole; plant, fertilize, and prune your trees; set up an irrigation system; and control pests and diseases. Lecture and hands-on format. This workshop will be taught by Chadwick Garden manager Orin Martin assisted by Sky DeMuro and Zoe Hitchner. Registration cost includes Fruit Tree Reader.

$250 general/$225 Friends of the Farm & Garden members/$75 UCSC students. Pre-registration required by Wednesday, February 5. Registration details and online registration site information will be announced here by November 15.
Start Date: 2014-02-08
Start Time: 10:00
End Date: 2014-02-09
End Time: 16:00

Weekend Pome Fruit Intensive

Title: Weekend Pome Fruit Intensive
Location: Alan Chadwick Garden, UC Santa Cruz
Description: Join us on February 8-9 from 10 am – 4 pm at UCSC’s Alan Chadwick Garden for a weekend devoted to pome fruits (focus on apples and pears). Learn how to select appropriate pome tree rootstocks, varieties and planting sites; choose and use the right tools; prepare the planting hole; plant, fertilize, and prune your trees; set up an irrigation system; plant cover crops; and control pests and diseases. Lecture and hands-on format. This workshop will be taught by Chadwick Garden manager Orin Martin assisted by Sky DeMuro and Zoe Hitchner. Cost includes Fruit Tree Reader.
$225 for Friends of the UCSC Farm and Garden/$250 general/$75 UCSC students. Pre-registration required by Wednesday, February 5. Registration details and online registration site will be announced here by November 15.
Start Date: 2013-02-08
Start Time: 10:00
End Date: 2013-02-09
End Time: 16:00

Basic Pome Fruit Pruning, with a Focus on Apples and Pears

Title: Basic Pome Fruit Pruning, with a Focus on Apples and Pears
Location: Louise Cain Gatehouse, UCSC Farm
Description: Review the goals and techniques of pruning apple, pear, and other pome fruit trees with Chadwick Garden manager Orin Martin and Orchard Keepers owner Matthew Sutton. Get some hands-on pointers on how to prune your fruit trees to maximize health and production. Wear warm clothes and bring a snack; heavy rain cancels.
$30 for general public, $20 for Friends of the Farm & Garden members, $5 for current UCSC students, payable the day of the workshop (cash or check only). Note: rainout date = February 23.
Start Time: 10:00
Date: 2014-02-01
End Time: 13:00

Harvest Festival Coming Up on September 29

Bright orange pumpkins, roasted red peppers, and apples galore mark the changing seasons at the 19thannual Fall Harvest Festival, coming up on Sunday, September 29 at UC Santa Cruz’s 30-acre organic farm.

The festival features live music from reggae to bluegrass, along with hay rides, kids’ crafts, workshops, tours, pumpkin and produce sales, and campus and community group information tables.

Visitors of all ages are invited to sample more than 25 apple varieties, savor roasted peppers, enter the pie baking contest, try their hand at pressing cider, scale the climbing wall, and enjoy locally sourced, tasty treats.

Also on tap—workshops on making salsa, growing and using peppers, saving seeds, creating popcorn treats, and understanding permaculture design, along with farm tours and an herb walk through the garden.

The festival will take place at the UC Santa Cruz Farm on Sunday, September 29, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for UCSC students, kids 12 and under, and for members of the Friends of the UCSC Farm & Garden; general admission is $5. See below for a full schedule of the day’s events.

Want so see how your favorite apple pie recipe measures up? Be sure to enter the Apple Pie Contest by 12:30 pm (see rules, below).

The Harvest Festival is cosponsored by the UCSC Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems (CASFS), UCSC’s Measure 43, and the Friends of the UCSC Farm & Garden, with major support from Driscoll’s, and additional support from New Leaf Community Markets, Tradin Organics, and Veritable Vegetable. People Power will provide free valet parking for bicycles.

Click here for directions to the UCSC Farm. Free parking will be available at the Campus Facilities and Barn Theater parking lots, and a free shuttle will be available. For more information call (831) 459-3240 or email casfs@ucsc.edu.

2013 Harvest Festival Schedule

MUSIC

Feed Me Jack          11:00 – 12:00

The Downbeets       12:15 – 1:30

Live Elk                      1:45 – 2:45

Kinetic Poetics         3:00 – 3:25

Ancestree Reggae   3:30 – 5:00

Activities, tours, workshops

Apple and Pepper Variety Tasting                          11:30 – 4:00

Apple Pie Contest Bake-Off (entry deadline)       12:30

Salsa It Up!                                                                    12:00 – 1:00
Crystal Owings, Food Systems Working Group

Guided Tours of the UCSC Farm                              12:30 and 4 pm

Popcorn Palooza                                                         1:15 – 2:15
Austin Lewis, Food Systems Working Group

Herb Talk & Walk through the Garden                2:00 – 3:00
Darren Huckle, Western/Chinese herbalist & licensed acupuncturist

Introduction to Permaculture Design                  3:00 – 3:45
David Shaw, UCSC Common Ground Center

Pepper Talk: Varieties and How to Use Them      3:30 – 4:00
Orin Martin, manager of the Alan Chadwick Garden

Seed Saving and Cleaning Workshop                    4:00 – 5:00
Cole Thomas and Connor Spears, Demeter Seed Project


Official Rules for the Friends of the UCSC Farm & Garden Apple Pie Contest

Pie entries accepted 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Official judging begins at 12:45 p.m.

Winners will be announced at between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.

1. The Friends of Farm and Garden Apple Pie Bake-Off is a nonprofessional baking competition open to Harvest Festival attendees (entry to the Harvest Festival is $5; free admission for UCSC students, Friends of the Farm & Garden members and for children 12 and under).

2. Contestants are responsible for submitting a written (preferably typed) recipe with their pie.

3. Contestants are responsible for supplying all ingredients and baking the pie prior to bringing it to the contest.

4. All entries in this contest must be homemade.

5. A representative of the Friends of the Farm & Garden will assign each contestant a number. Contestants should verify that the number on the bottom of their container is the same number assigned by the representative.

6. Contestants’ entries are judged on taste, presentation, and creativity.

7. The decision of the judges shall be final. Pie not consumed during judging will be returned to the contestant.

All pies must be entered by 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, September 29, at the Fall Harvest Festival, UCSC Farm. For questions or additional copies of the rules, call (831) 459-3240 or e-mail casfs@ucsc.edu.


Are we losing the battle against GM crops? – Permaculture Magazine


Permaculture Magazine

Are we losing the battle against GM crops?
Permaculture Magazine
Another world is possible. See what it might look like. Please support us and SUBSCRIBE to Permaculture – download a FREE sample issue and try before you buy. Also available as a digital subscription (for just £10) and for Apple and Android devices.

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Summer harvest is underway

IMG_6810_ed_lJune begins my summer harvesting season, with berries and stone fruit in abundance. This was my harvest one day about a week ago–mostly blackberries, some raspberries and a few apriums. The blackberries and raspberries are slowing down now, but the apriums and apricots are in full harvest. I started harvesting my blueberries about a week ago and they are just starting to produce in quantity. In about a week my plums will be coming in. My figs, grapes and apples are other perennials well on their way, too.

My annual crops are already starting to come in. I picked a cucumber a few days ago, and I’ve got two kinds of summer squash that I’ll start to pick in a few days. This is the best part of the year, with all these fresh fruits and vegetables to eat, preserve and share. Life is good as an urban farmer.

Pomegranate patience pays off

IMG_6815_ed_lA number of years ago, I finished planting out my backyard mini-farm, with raspberries, grapes, blueberries and a pomegranate. I’ve harvested the berries for a couple years, last year was my first small crop of grapes (this year looks to be stupendous) and I’ve been waiting patiently for my pomegranate to produce. A week ago, I noticed these little red “things” on my pomegranate, evidence that this year I’ll get my first pomegranates. Hurray!

I say “things” because I’m not yet familiar with the persimmon’s flowering and fruiting habits. I don’t know if this is a flower bud that has yet to open or, if I missed the flowers and this is already fruit on the way. Does anyone know?

In any case, flower or fruit, I look forward to watching it do its thing and to eating pomegranate seeds later this year.

I still have one tree–a pineapple guava–that has yet to produce fruit. It has flowered in past years, one of the most beautiful flowers I’ve ever seen, but has produced no fruit yet. So, I continue to be patient…

Company defends profitable poisons

Did you know it was Poison Prevention Week last week? It is ironic that as we marked this week, we also grappled with the news that for the first time in nearly 20 years, a company went to court to challenge a decision by EPA to cancel one of their products — a pesticide that causes thousands of accidental poisonings each year.

Earlier this month Reckitt Benckiser, manufacturer of d-Con rat control products filed a challenge against EPA’s decision to cancel specific over-the-counter rodenticide products, which are hazardous for children, pets and wildlife. No hearing date has been set, but the appeal could potentially drag on for years. Meanwhile, the products remain on the market.

read more

Pa. apple growers to benefit from addition of tree-fruit pathologist

Pennsylvania has a strong tree-fruit industry, led by the nation’s fourth largest apple crop. But diseases that damage fruit can severely limit production, causing potentially millions of dollars in losses annually. Helping growers manage these diseases and minimize associated costs is the job of tree-fruit pathologist Kari Peter, who began work in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences on March 1.

Preventing partnerships: Timber companies & indigenous groups grapple over … – Reuters AlertNet (blog)

Preventing partnerships: Timber companies & indigenous groups grapple over
Reuters AlertNet (blog)
emphasises that the forestry industry is currently littered with cases like this, which could benefit from effective community-company partnerships. This research was carried out as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

Preventing partnerships: Timber companies & indigenous groups grapple over … – Forests Blog, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Preventing partnerships: Timber companies & indigenous groups grapple over
Forests Blog, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
emphasises that the forestry industry is currently littered with cases like this, which could benefit from effective community-company partnerships. This research was carried out as part of the CGIAR Research Programme, 'Forests, Trees and

Speaker urges Monterey Bay to promote itself as a region – Monterey County Herald

Speaker urges Monterey Bay to promote itself as a region
Monterey County Herald
Wasson asked, citing innovation at Love Apple Farm in Scotts Valley, UC Santa Cruz agroecology program and high-end restaurant Manresa in Los Gatos. "Not everybody knows where (Monterey Bay) is." Rep. Sam Farr, D-Carmel, who championed a bill that

and more »

Monterey Bay International Trade Association showcases business opportunities – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Monterey Bay International Trade Association showcases business opportunities
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Wasson asked, citing innovation at Love Apple Farm in Scotts Valley, UC Santa Cruz agroecology program and high-end restaurant Manresa in Los Gatos. "Not everybody knows where (Monterey Bay) is." Rep. Sam Farr, D-Carmel, who championed a bill that

and more »

Salon Event Featuring Orin and Stephanie Martin

Title: Salon Event Featuring Orin and Stephanie Martin
Location: Gabriella Café, 910 Cedar Street, Santa Cruz
Description: On Thursday, November 8 at 7:30 pm, enjoy a $35 4-course dinner at Gabriella Café. Orin Martin, manager of UCSC’s Alan Chadwick Garden, will discuss the history of peppers, kale and apples and offer a tasting of these popular local crops. Stephanie Martin’s artwork will be on display, and she’ll talk about her techniques as a painter and printmaker. For reservations call 831.457-1677
Start Time: 19:30
Date: 2012-11-08

Pick Up Day for Winter Produce Box

Title: Pick Up Day for Winter Produce Box
Location: CSA Barn, UCSC Farm
Link out: Click here
Description: Reserve your special “Winter Box” of UCSC produce by November 16 for pick up on November 30 at the UCSC Farm from 12 noon – 5:30 pm. The $40 box includes a variety of organic produce from the UCSC Farm and Garden, including persimmons, apples, kiwis, greens, squash, broccoli and more. See the “Link out” for a link to the Winter Box order form.
Start Time: 12:00
Date: 2012-11-30
End Time: 17:30

Reserve Your Winter Produce Box

Title: Reserve Your Winter Produce Box
Location: UCSC Farm
Link out: Click here
Description: Reserve your special “Winter Box” of UCSC produce by November 16 for pick up on November 30 at the UCSC Farm. The $40 box includes a variety of organic produce from the UCSC Farm and Garden, including persimmons, apples, kiwis, greens, squash, broccoli and more. See the “Link out” for more information and a link to the downloadable order form. Questions? Call 831.459-3240 or email casfs@ucsc.edu.
Date: 2012-11-16

Reserve Your Winter Produce Box by November 16

Reserve your special “Winter Box” of UCSC produce by November 16 for pick up on November 30 at the UCSC Farm. The $40 box includes a variety of organic produce from the UCSC Farm and Garden, including persimmons, apples, kiwis, greens, squash, broccoli and more. Click here to download the order form for printing and mailing.
Questions? Call 831.459-3240 or email casfs@ucsc.edu.

Blueberry Bushes, Grapevines, Citrus, Apple Trees and More for Sale Now from … – Phoenix New Times (blog)


Phoenix New Times (blog)

Blueberry Bushes, Grapevines, Citrus, Apple Trees and More for Sale Now from
Phoenix New Times (blog)
This is where the Valley Permaculture Alliance's annual fruit tree sale could come to the rescue. Not only are trees on sale til November 20, VPA is offering offering classes in tree and plant maintenance. See also: – Five Permaculture Tips for

Distribution of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata in Pampean streams (Argentina) at different spatial scales

Publication year: 2012
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
María E. Seuffert, Pablo R. Martín
Studies dealing with the distribution of freshwater mollusks in the Pampean plains are very scarce and have all focused on the determinants of their presence among different waterbodies. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata among and within Pampean streams. The main sampling scheme included heterogeneous sections within different sites belonging to all the streams of the Encadenadas del Oeste basin (Buenos Aires Province), in which apple snails’ presence and abundance as well as several environmental variables were recorded. P. canaliculata was present in long streams originating in the Piedmont area, with the exception of one that suffered extensive dredging works but it was absent in short streams originating in the plains. Lower altitudes and higher organic matter contents characterized the inhabited sites among the long streams. At a smaller scale, higher concentrations of Na+ and lower levels of organic suspended matter characterized the inhabited sections. Within the short streams P. canaliculata was only found at sites located downstream from a connection to an inhabited long stream and hence constituted sink populations; short streams presented alkaline waters with high conductivity, very slow currents and no trees. The microhabitat of P. canaliculata was investigated at two sites from two different streams in which environmental variables were registered at individual snails’ locations and at systematically distributed points. Apple snails were more frequently found in places located close to the shore, where current velocity was usually low, sediments fine and rich in organic matter, and macrophytes abundant. These variables were all correlated at this small scale thus making their individual interpretation difficult. All the streams in this basin appear to be habitable for P. canaliculata , but the populations would only persist autonomously in the medium and low reaches on the long streams. The distribution within long streams is probably governed by stochastic patterns of extinction-colonization as a consequence of the variability of the climatic and hydrological conditions in this region.

Follow the Fruit Trees September Workshop

Title: Follow the Fruit Trees September Workshop
Location: Alan Chadwick Garden
Description: Join us on Sunday, September 16 from 10 am – 4 pm for a day-long lecture and hands-on workshop on late summer tree care and preparing for winter.
Cost of the class is $100 general public, $90 for Friends of the Farm & Garden.
Please call 831.459-3240 or email casfs@ucsc.edu for registration details.
Topics and activities for the workshop will include:
Cover cropping
Summer pruning
Apple tasting
Using and processing fruit
Preparation for winter planting
Start Time: 10:00
Date: 2012-09-16
End Time: 16:00

It’s going to be a very good year!

This year looks to be my best yet for growing food. The warm winter, followed by a wet spring, resulted in blossoms galore and lots of soil moisture for my plants. Following is a sampling of fruits and veggies on their way, in various states of growth. Enjoy this beauty from my garden that I get to enjoy every day. As always, you can click on any photo to see a larger version.

Baby plums

Blueberries

Beet sprouts

Baby apples

Apriums–only my second year of these sweet-tart taste bombs.

String bean sprout–first time I’ve been on the ball early enough to plant these from seed.

Blackberry vine–my old standby.

Baby grapes. This is my first year to harvest grapes after several years of growing out the vines. Looks like I’ll have a bumper crop!

I’ve got a good crop of spiders, too! I think these are the orb weavers that are all over my garden later in the summer.