US University Selects Costa Rica as Sociology Course Focus – The Costa Rica Star


The Costa Rica Star

US University Selects Costa Rica as Sociology Course Focus
The Costa Rica Star
Hosted by the Center for Tropical Agriculture Research and Higher Education (CATIE), in Costa Rica, the weeklong study trip includes lectures on topics such as agroecology, sustainable agricultural systems, sustainable tourism and biodiversity. Site

NSIA, Lafarge, Ogun partner on State’s Forest Landscape Restoration Project – BusinessDay


BusinessDay

NSIA, Lafarge, Ogun partner on State's Forest Landscape Restoration Project
BusinessDay
development objectives by applying the latest findings of agro-ecology and agro-forestry. The first part of the area will be rehabilitated through mixed reforestation to provide biodiversity hotspots corridors, allowing nomadic herders to cross the

Harvesting the Research: Agricultural Intensification Threatens Soil Biodiversity – Food Tank (blog)

Harvesting the Research: Agricultural Intensification Threatens Soil Biodiversity
Food Tank (blog)
Tsiafouli will host the research topic of “Optimizing the delivery of multiple ecosystem goods and services in agricultural systems” for the Frontiers Journal's call for papers on “Agroecology and land use systems.” The topic aims to collect papers

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livelihoods – GoKunming – GoKunming (blog)


GoKunming (blog)

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livelihoods – GoKunming
GoKunming (blog)
The research was published by scientific journal Global Environmental Change and constitutes a joint effort by researchers at the World Agroforestry Centre, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, the University of

and more »

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livelihoods – GoKunming (blog)


GoKunming (blog)

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livelihoods
GoKunming (blog)
The research was published by scientific journal Global Environmental Change and constitutes a joint effort by researchers at the World Agroforestry Centre, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, the University of

and more »

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livlihoods – GoKunming – GoKunming (blog)


GoKunming (blog)

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livlihoods – GoKunming
GoKunming (blog)
The research was published by scientific journal Global Environmental Change and constitutes a joint effort by researchers at the World Agroforestry Centre, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, the University of

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livlihoods – GoKunming (blog)


GoKunming (blog)

Report: Rubber plantations threaten biodiversity and livlihoods
GoKunming (blog)
The research was published by scientific journal Global Environmental Change and constitutes a joint effort by researchers at the World Agroforestry Centre, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, the University of

allAfrica.com: Africa: Indigenous Knowledge Key to Climate Change Adaptation – AllAfrica.com

allAfrica.com: Africa: Indigenous Knowledge Key to Climate Change Adaptation
AllAfrica.com
Findings also show that farmers who practice agro-ecology draw upon their understanding of local ecologies and biodiversity in their cultivation methods. The most common agro-ecology cultivation practiced entails integration of livestock, crops

Rubber expansion threatens biodiversity and livelihoods – Phys.Org


Phys.Org

Rubber expansion threatens biodiversity and livelihoods
Phys.Org
The research was recently published in Global Environmental Change and constitutes a joint effort by scientists at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) East and Central Asia office, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, …

and more »

Rubber expansion threatens biodiversity and livelihoods – Phys.org – Phys.Org


Phys.Org

Rubber expansion threatens biodiversity and livelihoods – Phys.org
Phys.Org
The research was recently published in Global Environmental Change and constitutes a joint effort by scientists at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) East and Central Asia office, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, …

and more »

Government urged NOT to sign Protocol on Protection of new Plant Varieties – Lusaka Times

Government urged NOT to sign Protocol on Protection of new Plant Varieties
Lusaka Times
The Zambia Alliance for Agro-Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation has called on government not to sign the African Region Intellectual Property Organization (ARIPO) draft protocol on the protection of new plant varieties as it criminalizes small scale …

Call for contributions: ABS of plant genetic resources for farmers and … – Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research

Call for contributions: ABS of plant genetic resources for farmers and
Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research
In a forthcoming special issue of the magazine “Farming Matters,” ILEIA in collaboration with Bioversity International will explore if and how access and benefit sharing related to plant genetic resources can work for family farmers and agroecology.

Effects of habitat types and within lake environmental gradients on the diversity of chironomid assemblages

Publication date: Available online 30 May 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Diána Árva , András Specziár , Tibor Erős , Mónika Tóth
Understanding the distribution of biotic diversity across various spatial scales and environmental gradients is important from fundamental, practical and conservation biological aspects. We applied a hierarchical diversity partitioning framework to quantify the variability of sample level α- and β 1 -diversity, and environment related β 2 -diversity of benthic chironomid assemblages within and among a priori defined habitat types, and along the gradients of individual environmental factors in a large and shallow lake (Lake Balaton, Hungary). Taxon richness (both additive and multiplicative) and Shannon index based diversity approaches yielded highly concordant results. The α-diversity was much lower and β 1 -diversity higher than predicted by null model and both measures varied substantially among habitat types and along most individual environmental gradients. The β 2 -diversity indicated a marked variability of taxon (identified at species to genus level) pool among habitat types and higher than predicted taxon turnover along all examined environmental gradients. Moreover, the observed β 2 -diversity varied greatly among individual environmental gradients. The difference between the expected and observed β 2 -diversity values suggests that taxon turnover was most influential (in decreasing order) along the algae coverage gradient, the lake bed substratum gradient and the macrophyte coverage gradient among others. We argue that within-lake environmental heterogeneity and its effect on the taxon richness should receive more attention in biodiversity assessment and conservation. Management could benefit from the identification of within lake gradients along which taxonomic turnover maximizes.

Southwest Pacific Ministers Focus on Climate-Smart Agriculture – IISD Reporting Services

Southwest Pacific Ministers Focus on Climate-Smart Agriculture
IISD Reporting Services
The ministers agreed that "addressing issues such as soil health, biodiversity, agroforestry, and promoting integration of sound traditional practices into commercial production are required." After hearing a report on the mid-term review of the FAO

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Inter-basin dispersal through irrigation canals explains low genetic structure in Diplomystes cf. chilensis, an endangered freshwater catfish from Central Chile

Publication date: Available online 19 May 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): C.P. Muñoz-Ramírez , P.F. Victoriano , E. Habit
Biotic homogenization in freshwater ecosystems is a growing concern among conservation biologists. Recent phylogeographic data has shown low genetic structure between some basins from Central Chile, hypothesizing that either current dispersal through irrigation canals or incomplete lineage sorting due to recent divergence might explain the observed patterns. However, these hypotheses remain untested despite their potential implications for freshwater biodiversity and conservation. We used a statistical, model-based framework (approximate Bayesian computation) to investigate the relative support for each of these hypotheses. Our results show strong support for the model involving current migration between basins, and rejected the model of recent divergence without migration. These results strongly suggest that irrigation canals are facilitating the dispersal between basins, posing a serious threat to biodiversity in Central Chile, an area considered a biodiversity hotspot. Finally, these results highlight the utility of model-based approaches for determining demographic processes with potential conservation implications, even with the lack of extensive molecular data.

Can agroecology save us from ‘scorched-earth’ agriculture? – The Ecologist

Can agroecology save us from 'scorched-earth' agriculture?
The Ecologist
Industrial agriculture has become a prime driver of many of the world's most serious problems, writes Henrietta Moore: the loss of wild and farmed biodiversity, huge climate-changing emissions, and the entrapment of small farmers in ever-deepening

CoMo SOS: Root Cellar, Chert Hollow Farm showcase Sustainable, Organic … – Columbia Heart Beat


Columbia Heart Beat

CoMo SOS: Root Cellar, Chert Hollow Farm showcase Sustainable, Organic
Columbia Heart Beat
"Agroforestry is an important aspect of our overall farm management" Eric explains. "We only use & sell wood cut & milled on-farm, using methods that help preserve soil and enhance biodiversity on our land." For people with multi-story houses

The tires on your car threaten Asian biodiversity – Science /AAAS


Science /AAAS

The tires on your car threaten Asian biodiversity
Science /AAAS
Some growers embrace agroforestry practices, in which rubber trees are mixed in with native vegetation. Agroforests are more benign for biodiversity. But rubber yields are lower than in monoculture plantations where rubber trees completely supplant
Tropical biodiversity being rubbed out Geographical



all 7 news articles »

Tropical biodiversity being rubbed out – Geographical


Geographical

Tropical biodiversity being rubbed out
Geographical
Proper land use planning, research into the potential for agroforestry rubber vs monoculture rubber to meet demand, and research assessing how best to minimise impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services within monocultural plantation landscapes are …

and more »

Forest degradation as bad for climate as deforestation, says report – Carbon Brief (blog)


Carbon Brief (blog)

Forest degradation as bad for climate as deforestation, says report
Carbon Brief (blog)
But now with growing interest in forest and landscape restoration, there is a surge of interest in degradation, potential for natural regeneration, agroforestry and other approaches to help recover productivity as well as biomass and biodiversity

Will the World Bank get truly climate smart? – Bretton Woods Observer


Bretton Woods Observer

Will the World Bank get truly climate smart?
Bretton Woods Observer
Such intensified 'agroecological' farms can enhance food security, maintain greater levels of biodiversity, and provide resilience against climate extremes. But it will take a revolution in financial and economic incentives to allow them to compete

Biosafety authority ‘toothless’ – conservationists – Zambia Daily Mail


Zambia Daily Mail

Biosafety authority 'toothless' – conservationists
Zambia Daily Mail
THE Zambia Alliance for Agro-ecology and Biodiversity Conservation (ZAABC) says there is an influx of genetically-modified (GM) food products in some supermarkets due to failure by the National Biosafety Authority (NBA) to carry out its mandate

Why shade-grown coffee is good for birds and farmers – The Conversation US

Why shade-grown coffee is good for birds and farmers
The Conversation US
Agroforestry – a technique that combines crops with a mixture of trees and shrubs – is particularly important for biodiversity conservation. Shade coffee farming, where the crop is grown under a tree canopy, is one of the most biodiversity-friendly

Agroforestry systems of the lowland alluvial valleys of the tehuacan-cuicatlan … – 7thSpace Interactive (press release)

Agroforestry systems of the lowland alluvial valleys of the tehuacan-cuicatlan
7thSpace Interactive (press release)
Agroforestry systems (AFS) are valuable production systems that allow concealing benefits provision with conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services. We analysed AFS of the zone of alluvial valleys of the Tehuacan-Cuicatlan Valley (TCV), Mexico

Farmer supports Lismore’s biodiversity management strategy – Northern Star


Northern Star

Farmer supports Lismore's biodiversity management strategy
Northern Star
CATTLE and agroforestry farmer Paul Hunter says he knows better than most how a biodiversity management strategy could benefit the Lismore local government area. The Goonellabah resident's farm is located in the Tweed Shire, where that council …

and more »

Regardless of the Groundhog’s Shadow, Farmers and Scientists are Planning for … – The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)


The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)

Regardless of the Groundhog's Shadow, Farmers and Scientists are Planning for
The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)
… benefits, ranging from diminished erosion rates to increased biodiversity. While crop plans incorporating these and other agroecology practices can be more challenging, experts agree that they promise to support a healthier food and farm future.

Fine sediment deposition affects biodiversity and density of benthic macroinvertebrates: A case study in the freshwater pearl mussel river Waldaist (Upper Austria)

Publication date: Available online 29 December 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): P. Leitner , C. Hauer , T. Ofenböck , F. Pletterbauer , A. Schmidt-Kloiber , W. Graf
Fine sediment deposition in stream beds frequently generated by certain land use practices has become an increasing stressor for rivers throughout the world. In this study, the role of fine sediment deposition and its impact on the benthic macro-invertebrate assemblages was investigated in a low mountain freshwater pearl mussel stream, the Waldaist. Communities of unaffected sites and sites under high fine sediment deposition were compared. Distinct reactions of benthic assemblages in fine gravelly habitats were ascertained demonstrating a severe but still underestimated threat for invertebrate biodiversity.

Studying in the rainforest: Birmingham native spending month studying in Brazil – AL.com

Studying in the rainforest: Birmingham native spending month studying in Brazil
AL.com
… to participate the all-expense-paid program that offers opportunities for American and Brazilian students to live and study together in a practical internship in the fields of biodiversity conservation, agro-ecology and sustainable environmental

Fine sediment deposition affects biodiversity and density of benthic macroinvertebrates: 1: A case study in the freshwater pearl mussel river Waldaist (Upper Austria)

Publication date: Available online 29 December 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): P. Leitner , C. Hauer , T. Ofenböck , F. Pletterbauer , A. Schmidt-Kloiber , W. Graf
Fine sediment deposition in stream beds frequently generated by certain land use practices has become an increasing stressor for rivers throughout the world. In this study, the role of fine sediment deposition and its impact on the benthic macro-invertebrate assemblages was investigated in a low mountain freshwater pearl mussel stream, the Waldaist. Communities of unaffected sites and sites under high fine sediment deposition were compared. Distinct reactions of benthic assemblages in fine gravelly habitats were ascertained demonstrating a severe but still underestimated threat for invertebrate biodiversity.

Contrasting decay rates of freshwater bivalves’ shells: Aquatic versus terrestrial habitats

Publication date: March 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters, Volume 51
Author(s): M.I. Ilarri , A.T. Souza , R. Sousa
Freshwater flow regimes are particularly vulnerable to global climate change with changes to the volume and regime of water contributing to global declines in freshwater biodiversity. Droughts or floods can cause massive mortalities of freshwater bivalves, facilitating the accumulation of shells in the aquatic but also in adjacent terrestrial habitats. In order to fully understand the long term impact of these massive mortality events, it is important to assess how bivalve shells persist in the environment. Given that, the present study aimed at studying the shell decays of four different bivalve species ( Anodonta anatina , Corbicula fluminea , Potomida littoralis and Unio delphinus ) in aquatic (i.e. river) versus terrestrial (i.e. sand soil) habitats. Shell decay rates were significantly different among species and habitats. In the aquatic habitat the shell decay rates varied among species, with the native species A . anatina , which have the largest and thinnest shell, showing the highest decay rate. Alternatively, in the terrestrial habitat the shell decay rates were more even among species and not related to a particular shell feature or morphology, with the native U . delphinus showing the fastest decay. The shell decay rates were 6 to 12 times higher in aquatic than in the terrestrial habitat. These results suggest that bivalve shells can persist for long periods of time on both habitats (but mainly in terrestrial), which may perhaps trigger significant changes on the ecosystem structure and functioning.

A new fish-based multi-metric assessment index for cyprinid streams in the Iranian Caspian Sea Basin

Publication date: Available online 1 December 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Hossein Mostafavi , Rafaela Schinegger , Andreas Melcher , Karl Moder , Carina Mielach , Stefan Schmutz
A major issue for water resource management is the assessment of environmental degradation of lotic ecosystems. The overall aim of this study is to develop a multi-metric fish index for the cyprinid streams of the Caspian Sea Basin (MMICS) in Iran. As species diversity and composition as well as population structure in the studied streams are different to other regions, there is a substantial need to develop a new fish index. We sampled fish and environmental data of 102 sites in medium sized streams. We analysed human pressures at different spatial scales and determined applicable fish metrics showing a response to human pressures. In total, five structural and functional types of metrics (i.e. biodiversity, habitat, reproduction, trophic level and water quality sensitivity) were considered. In addition, we used 29 criteria describing major anthropogenic human pressures at sampling sites and generated a regional pressure index (RPI) that accounted for potential effects of multiple human pressures. For the MMICS development, we first defined reference sites (least disturbed) and secondly quantified differences of fish metrics between reference and impaired sites. We used a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) to describe metric responses to natural environmental differences in least disturbed conditions. By including impaired sites, the residual distributions of these models described the response range of each metric to human pressures, independently of natural environmental influence. Finally, seven fish metrics showed the best ability to discriminate between impaired and reference sites. The multi-metric fish index performed well in discriminating human pressure classes, giving a significant negative linear response to a gradient of the RPI. These methods can be used for further development of a standardised monitoring tool to assess the ecological status and trends in biological condition for streams of the whole country, considering its complex and diverse geology and climate.

Traditional Knowledge Fuels Yurok and Karuk Habitat Restoration Project With … – Indian Country Today Media Network


Indian Country Today Media Network

Traditional Knowledge Fuels Yurok and Karuk Habitat Restoration Project With
Indian Country Today Media Network
Stewards of their ancestral lands for millennia, today the tribes are using traditional agroforestry management methods to bring back some of the habitat and biodiversity of the forests that they call home, according to a blog entry by the U.S

Promoting agrobiodiversity conservation and use in Sri Lankan agroecosystems … – Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research

Promoting agrobiodiversity conservation and use in Sri Lankan agroecosystems
Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research
It is concerned with a wide range of agrobiodiversity, including crops, agroforestry, animals, fish, and the associated soil and pollinator diversity found in the different production systems involved. It will explicitly explore the ways in which

FUW highlights concerns over exclusion of grazed woodland – Smallholder

FUW highlights concerns over exclusion of grazed woodland
Smallholder
“Given the above, and the importance of agroforestry to rural economies, biodiversity, landscapes and carbon capture, we would urge you to do all you can to reverse a decision which will have a range of adverse and unintended consequences, particularly …

FUW highlights concerns over exclusion of grazed woodland – Somerset County Gazette

FUW highlights concerns over exclusion of grazed woodland
Somerset County Gazette
“Given the above, and the importance of agroforestry to rural economies, biodiversity, landscapes and carbon capture, we would urge you to do all you can to reverse a decision which will have a range of adverse and unintended consequences, particularly …

FUW highlights concerns over exclusion of grazed woodland – Farming UK

FUW highlights concerns over exclusion of grazed woodland
Farming UK
"Given the above, and the importance of agroforestry to rural economies, biodiversity, landscapes and carbon capture, we would urge you to do all you can to reverse a decision which will have a range of adverse and unintended consequences, particularly …

Re-establishing Tribal Biodiversity through Agroforestry – USDA.gov (press release) (blog)


USDA.gov (press release) (blog)

Re-establishing Tribal Biodiversity through Agroforestry
USDA.gov (press release) (blog)
The Karuk and Yurok Tribes traditionally managed entire watersheds and ecosystems on their ancestral lands to meet their dietary, cultural and spiritual needs. The Tribes are now working with University of California -Berkeley, University of California

CAN Makes 1st Annual Good Food Org Guide

Posted in: News   Topics: About CAN,


The 1st Annual Good Food Org Guide, developed by The James Beard Foundation and Food Tank, highlights non-profit organizations that are “… doing exemplary work in the United States in the areas of food and agriculture, nutrition and health, hunger and obesity, and food justice. Only nonprofit, scholarly, and municipal initiatives have been selected in order to spotlight efforts that are focused on community building and engagement, advocacy, and service. More than 400 U.S.-based groups are cultivating a better food system. The list was determined by distinguished experts, including past recipients of the James Beard Leadership Award and food and agriculture leaders.” The issues the groups address include: childhood obesity, malnourishment, and physical inactivity; food waste; and consumer education on healthy, nutritious food choices. Through their work they create networks of social entrepreneurs; protect food and restaurant workers; highlight solutions for restoring the health of people and the planet; work with indigenous communities to preserve traditions, culture, and biodiversity; inspire and educate individuals to cook more of their own food; and protect public health, human health, and the environment. CAN is honored to be included among this year’s honorees.


5 things we can do to better ensure food security – Devex

5 things we can do to better ensure food security
Devex
The combined expertise of AIRCA centers cover a large spectrum of the research for development continuum including agro-biodiversity, agroforestry, integrated pest management, drought-tolerant crops, natural resource management and the conservation …

Explaining the “Hungry Farmer Paradox”

Most of the world’s food insecure people live in marginal rural environments. A recent study with coffee producers in northern Nicaragua’s highlands helps explain this “hungry farmer paradox.” These small-scale farmers experienced an average of three months of seasonal hunger over the year studied. Although cash income helped alleviate food scarcity, households that produced more subsistence crops, especially corn and tree fruits, reported still shorter periods of food scarcity. Meanwhile, farmers that used several commonly promoted environmentally friendly farming practices reported no discernible impacts on seasonal hunger.

In an article published in Global Environmental Change, Santa Clara University researchers, including Chris Bacon (Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences), Bill Sundstrom (Department of Economics), and two recently graduated Environmental Studies and Sciences students Ian Dougherty (now with the United Farm Workers Foundation) and Rica Santos (now with the National Council for Science and the Environment), concur with previous studies finding that several factors influence farmer food insecurity, including: (1) annual cycles of precipitation and rising maize prices during the lean months; (2) inter annual droughts and periodic storms; and (3) the long-term inability of coffee harvests and prices to provide sufficient income.

This work identifies the need for balancing coffee production with food production and improving exchange systems to protect farmers from adverse seasonal price fluctuations. It also considers a participatory initiative that uses fair trade cooperatives to increase rural food access through the re-localization of food distribution networks, sustainable agriculture training, and improved food storage. Although crop loss from coffee leaf rust contributes an additional challenge, these and other integrated strategies hold the potential to reduce threats to food security, livelihoods, and biodiversity.

Chris Bacon and Ernesto Mendez are CAN affiliate researchers; Maria Eugenia Flores Gomez is the CAN project manager for the Las Segovias project

* Bacon, C. M., Sundstrom, W. A., Flores Gómez, M. E., Ernesto Méndez, V., Santos, R., Goldoftas, B., & Dougherty, I. (2014). Explaining the ‘hungry farmer paradox’: Smallholders and fair trade cooperatives navigate seasonality and change in Nicaragua’s corn and coffee markets. Global Environmental Change, 25 (2014) 133–149

Author Affiliations

Christopher M. Bacon, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

William A. Sundstrom, Department of Economics, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA

 María Eugenia Flores Gómez, Community Agroecology Network, 595 Franklin Street, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA

 Ernesto Méndez, Environmental Program and Plant and Soil Science Department, University of Vermont,
The Bittersweet – 153 South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, USA

 Rica Santos, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

 Barbara Goldoftas, International Development, Community, & Environment Department, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610, USA

 Ian Dougherty, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

WAYNE CREED Urban Chickens Part of ‘Good Food’ Movement – Cape Charles Wave

WAYNE CREED Urban Chickens Part of 'Good Food' Movement
Cape Charles Wave
This “farming with nature,” agro-ecology approach promotes biodiversity, recycles plant nutrients, protects soil from erosion, conserves and protects water, uses minimum tillage, and integrates crop and livestock enterprises on the farm. More

National Day of Maize in Mexico: Protecting the Sacred Plant – Upside Down World


Upside Down World

National Day of Maize in Mexico: Protecting the Sacred Plant
Upside Down World
Adelita San Vicente Tello is an agronomist with a master's degree in rural development and a doctorate in agroecology. She is director of Seeds of Life (Semillas de Vida), a group promoting agro-biodiversity and protecting native corn. San Vicente is

and more »

ON NATIONAL DAY OF MAIZE IN MEXICO, PROTECTING THE SACRED PLANT – Huffington Post

ON NATIONAL DAY OF MAIZE IN MEXICO, PROTECTING THE SACRED PLANT
Huffington Post
Adelita San Vicente Tello is an agronomist with a master's degree in rural development and a doctorate in agroecology. She is director of Seeds of Life (Semillas de Vida), a group promoting agro-biodiversity and protecting native corn. San Vicente is

and more »

Dogs may be responsible for declining mammals in Brazil’s agroforests – Mongabay.com


Mongabay.com

Dogs may be responsible for declining mammals in Brazil's agroforests
Mongabay.com
Agroforestry is a land management strategy that is meant to balance farming production and biodiversity conservation. Here, agricultural products, such as cacao and coffee, are cultivated in association with native trees that support native wildlife

B is for biodiversity – World Development Movement (press release)


World Development Movement (press release)

B is for biodiversity
World Development Movement (press release)
This has nurtured biologically and genetically diverse smallholder farms with a robustness and a built-in resilience that has helped them to adjust to rapidly changing climates, pests, and diseases” – Miguel Altieri, prominent agroecology scientist

Working together to improve knowledge of agrobiodiversity maintenance and use – Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research

Working together to improve knowledge of agrobiodiversity maintenance and use
Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research
round-fao FAO will host an International Symposium on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition from 18th to 19th September to explore recent scientific research and knowledge and promote open dialogue while showcasing existing experiences and …

ENVIRONMENT: UN declares 2011-2020 as International Decade for Biodiversity – The Point

ENVIRONMENT: UN declares 2011-2020 as International Decade for Biodiversity
The Point
… integration of set-asides for biodiversity protection in compatible agroforestry and silvo-pastoral systems; promotion of seed banks and community biodiversity registers; improved effectiveness of traditional farming systems for conservation of

The Panama Canal Authority certifies Verified Emission Reductions or carbon … – PortNews IAA

The Panama Canal Authority certifies Verified Emission Reductions or carbon
PortNews IAA
These credits are based in the agroforestry, silvopastoral and reforestation activities in 2,458 hectares of the Panama Canal Watershed, following the standards established by the Climate, Community & Biodiversity Alliance (CCBA) and The Gold Standard …

and more »

World Bank to Support Forest Restoration and Conservation – AllAfrica.com

World Bank to Support Forest Restoration and Conservation
AllAfrica.com
The project will also focus on rehabilitating the forests and its biodiversity, improving sustainable land management and agroforestry, and introducing silvo-pastoral approaches. This will be complemented by direct support to community livelihoods

XV International Agroecology Shortcourse | End of Week One


Week One Wrap-Up

Throughout Central America there is a strong grassroots program called “Campesino a Campesino” where knowledge, based on farmer understanding, is shared. CAN has collaborated with Campesino a Campesino in several of our projects. We share similar philosophies of how to apply agroecology to achieve local food sovereignty.

We were visited by a team from Campesino a Campesino Nicaragua who shared their work with us. One of the leaders, Doña Carmen shared the work in her community of growing and saving local native corn seed. This is especially important today as a way to keep the high biodiversity of corn vibrant in communities throughout the Americas at a time when companies like Monsanto are attempting to get farmers such as these to use genetically modified corn which will lead to the loss of these local varieties. Hopefully these grassroot efforts to save the native varieties will flourish. It is organizations like Campesino a Campesino that will make this happen.

Robin, a student at UIMQROO and part of CAN’s International Youth Leadership Network, spoke to the course about his work with the women in the small Mayan town of Tabasco where they are developing alternative markets for locally grown food.

By the end of the week, course participants were divided into four groups. Each group will spend two days next week in a farming community talking with farm families and learning about the different efforts to develop sustainable practices that produce enough food to feed their families year round. Representatives from these four communities shared background information with course participants. CAN collaborates with farmers in two of these communities: (1) La Pita in San Ramón where AgroEco® Coffee comes from and (2) Cantagallo, a coffee growing cooperative that is part of CAN’s Las Segovias project. With this project, we are working together to develop ways to store grains and diversify farm production.

See photos. 

Further Issues to Consider in Deciding Whether to Introduce GE Crops and Food – AllAfrica.com

Further Issues to Consider in Deciding Whether to Introduce GE Crops and Food
AllAfrica.com
Agro-ecology is about ensuring agricultural biodiversity while also being productive, not simplifying production to large areas of monocropping, which depends on ever more expensive oil-based inputs to keep it going. Genetic engineering is industry's

A floodplain-scale lake classification based on characteristics of macroinvertebrate assemblages and corresponding environmental properties

Publication date: Available online 20 July 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Baozhu Pan , Hongzhu Wang , Haijun Wang
Floodplain lakes have been experiencing great pressures by human activities, and ecological functions in different types of lakes show different degrees of degradation. For facilitating conservation and management of different types of floodplain lakes, it is necessary to classify the lakes into similar groups according to certain standards. In this study, on basis of consideration of macroinvertebrate assemblages and corresponding environmental properties, the Yangtze floodplain lakes were classified into three major types grouping five groups of lakes: 1) river-disconnected lakes (algal lakes, macrophytic-algal transition lakes, and macrophytic lakes), 2) semi-connected lakes (oxbow lakes), 3) river-connected lakes. The classification of floodplain lakes mainly reflects the gradients of trophic and hydrological connectivity. The key factors structuring macroinvertebrate assemblages in the Yangtze floodplain lakes were mainly hydrological (connectivity rating, water depth), trophic (total phosphorus, macrophytes biomass) and morphometric (development of lake shoreline). Among the floodplain lakes, ecological status of river-connected lakes, where biodiversity, biomass and production of macroinvertebrates reached maxima, has been confirmed to be the best. From the view of conservation and management of the entire floodplain lakes, it is suggested that protecting the remnants of river-connected lakes, controlling eutrophication and linking disconnected lakes freely with the mainstream are crucial.

Ecological sanctuary: Permaculture principles help Monroe County nursery stay … – Greenfield Daily Reporter

Ecological sanctuary: Permaculture principles help Monroe County nursery stay
Greenfield Daily Reporter
Today, they run Bread and Roses Nursery and Gardens, a completely off-the-grid permaculture operation. The biodiversity aspect of permaculture helps address recent issues in contemporary growing, Willard said. "By having greater diversity, we're

and more »

Permaculture practices let nursery thrive off grid – Beaumont Enterprise

Permaculture practices let nursery thrive off grid
Beaumont Enterprise
Today, they run Bread and Roses Nursery and Gardens, a completely off-the-grid permaculture operation. The biodiversity aspect of permaculture helps address recent issues in contemporary growing, Willard said. "By having greater diversity, we're

and more »

Conflicting policies failing environmental protectionPublish Date: Jul 03, 2014 – New Vision


New Vision

Conflicting policies failing environmental protectionPublish Date: Jul 03, 2014
New Vision
The meeting, organized by World Vision and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), discussed ways Uganda can conserve her biodiversity, with special emphasis on restoration of indigenous tree species to counter the climate change threat. RELATED …

Farmer committed to restoring the land – Washington Times

Farmer committed to restoring the land
Washington Times
Shepherd, 51, is an internationally known expert in reclamation agriculture, permaculture and agroforestry – eco-friendly farming techniques that emphasize perennial crops, natural biodiversity and sustainable land management. “For years, people couldn

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Next big idea in forest conservation? Playing games to understand what drives … – Mongabay.com

Next big idea in forest conservation? Playing games to understand what drives
Mongabay.com
A paper by Harvey et al in 2008 proposed an agenda of strategies to maintain biodiversity in coffee agroforestry systems, but nowhere in the list were the prime interests of the coffee planters represented . In the coffee agroforestry landscape of the

Wisconsin farmer Mark Shepherd is committed to restoring the land – Minneapolis Star Tribune

Wisconsin farmer Mark Shepherd is committed to restoring the land
Minneapolis Star Tribune
Shepherd, 51, is an internationally known expert in reclamation agriculture, permaculture and agroforestry — eco-friendly farming techniques that emphasize perennial crops, natural biodiversity and sustainable land management. "For years, people

and more »

Mark Shepherd is committed to restoring the land – Jacksoncountychronicle

Mark Shepherd is committed to restoring the land
Jacksoncountychronicle
Shepherd, 51, is an internationally known expert in reclamation agriculture, permaculture and agroforestry — eco-friendly farming techniques that emphasize perennial crops, natural biodiversity and sustainable land management. “For years, people

The Global Rush for Rubber: Is Burma the ‘Final Frontier’? – The Irrawaddy News Magazine

The Global Rush for Rubber: Is Burma the 'Final Frontier'?
The Irrawaddy News Magazine
This type of agroforestry system, sometimes known as 'jungle rubber', can provide resilience to what are often volatile global markets whilst also helping protect biodiversity and ecosystems. In fact, the recent rapid increase and current crash in

The food system we choose affects biodiversity: Do we want monocultures? – eco-business.com


eco-business.com

The food system we choose affects biodiversity: Do we want monocultures?
eco-business.com
Improving water management in paddy rice production and increasing agro-biodiversity through agroforestry are just a few examples of how ecological farming practices could directly contribute to GHG reduction and help agriculture reduce the effects of …

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Over 50 countries ready for Monsanto’ planned march – spyghana.com


spyghana.com

Over 50 countries ready for Monsanto' planned march
spyghana.com
Agroecology is. Monsanto's harmful practices are causing soil infertility, mono-cropping, loss of biodiversity, habitat destruction, and contributing to beehive collapse. GMO crops cross pollinate with traditional crops, risking peasant farmers

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Occupy Sonoma County GMO Campaign against Monsanto – Sonoma County Gazette

Occupy Sonoma County GMO Campaign against Monsanto
Sonoma County Gazette
Biotechnology is not the solution to world hunger – agro-ecology is. Monsanto's harmful practices are causing soil infertility, mono-cropping, loss of biodiversity, habitat destruction, and beehive collapse. GMO crops cross-pollinate with traditional

and more »

The food system we choose affects biodiversity: do we want monocultures? – The Guardian


The Guardian

The food system we choose affects biodiversity: do we want monocultures?
The Guardian
Stopping chemical nitrogen fertiliser overuse and shifting to organic fertilisers (to increase soil fertility), improving water management in paddy rice production, and increasing agro-biodiversity through agroforestry are just a few examples of how

Article on Shade Coffee in BioScience

Posted in: News   Topics: Action Research Initiatives,


Shalene Jha, Christopher M. Bacon, Stacy M. Philpott, V. Ernesto Mendez, Peter Laderach and Robert A. Rice recently published an overview article, “Shade Coffee: Update on a Disappearing Refuge for Biodiversity,” in the May 2014 issue of the journal BioScience. Chris Bacon and Ernesto Mendez are CAN affiliated researchers.

 
Abstract: In the past three decades, coffee cultivation has gained widespread attention for its crucial role in supporting local and global biodiversity. In this synthetic Overview, we present newly gathered data that summarize how global patterns in coffee distribution and shade vegetation have changed and discuss implications for biodiversity, ecosystem services, and livelihoods. Although overall cultivated coffee area has decreased by 8% since 1990, coffee production and agricultural intensification have increased in many places and shifted globally, with production expanding in Asia while contracting in Africa. Ecosystem services such as pollination, pest control, climate regulation, and nutrient sequestration are generally greater in shaded coffee farms, but many coffee-growing regions are removing shade trees from their management. Although it is clear that there are ecological and socioeconomic benefits associated with shaded coffee, we expose the many challenges and future research priorities needed to link sustainable coffee management with sustainable livelihoods.
 
 

Explaining the “Hungry Farmer Paradox” | New Article


<--break->Most of the world’s food insecure people live in marginal rural environments. A recent study with coffee producers in northern Nicaragua’s highlands helps explain this “hungry farmer paradox.” These small-scale farmers experienced an average of three months of seasonal hunger over the year studied. Although cash income helped alleviate food scarcity, households that produced more subsistence crops, especially corn and tree fruits, reported still shorter periods of food scarcity. Meanwhile, farmers that used several commonly promoted environmentally friendly farming practices reported no discernible impacts on seasonal hunger. 

In an article published in Global Environmental Change*, a team of researchers, including CAN-affiliated researchers Chris Bacon (Professor, Santa Clara University) and Ernesto Méndez (Professor, University of Vermont) and CAN’s project manager for the Las Segovias project, Maria Eugenia Flores Gomez, concur with previous studies finding that several factors influence farmer food insecurity, including: (1) annual cycles of precipitation and rising maize prices during the lean months; (2) inter annual droughts and periodic storms; and (3) the long-term inability of coffee harvests and prices to provide sufficient income. 

This work identifies the need for balancing coffee production with food production and improving exchange systems to protect farmers from adverse seasonal price fluctuations. It also considers a participatory initiative that uses fair trade cooperatives to increase rural food access through the re-localization of food distribution networks, sustainable agriculture training, and improved food storage. Although crop loss from coffee leaf rust contributes an additional challenge, these and other integrated strategies hold the potential to reduce threats to food security, livelihoods, and biodiversity.

* Bacon, C. M., Sundstrom, W. A., Flores Gómez, M. E., Ernesto Méndez, V., Santos, R., Goldoftas, B., & Dougherty, I. (2014). “Explaining the ‘hungry farmer paradox’: Smallholders and fair trade cooperatives navigate seasonality and change in Nicaragua’s corn and coffee markets.” Global Environmental Change, 25 (2014) 133–149

 

“March Against Monsanto” May 24 in Over 50 Countries – Calling for the Boycott … – Center for Research on Globalization


Center for Research on Globalization

“March Against Monsanto” May 24 in Over 50 Countries – Calling for the Boycott
Center for Research on Globalization
Agroecology is. Monsanto's harmful practices are causing soil infertility, mono-cropping, loss of biodiversity, habitat destruction, and contributing to beehive collapse. GMO crops cross pollinate with traditional crops, risking peasant farmers

Daikin Invests with Conservation International on a Global Scale to Save … – PR Web (press release)

Daikin Invests with Conservation International on a Global Scale to Save
PR Web (press release)
China: Through the promotion of agroforestry practices in key areas in the mountains of Southwest China, Daikin's contribution will support CI-China's actions with local communities in the Mountains of Southwest China, a biodiversity hotspot, to adapt

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Daikin Invests with Conservation International on a Global Scale to Save … – DigitalJournal.com

Daikin Invests with Conservation International on a Global Scale to Save
DigitalJournal.com
China: Through the promotion of agroforestry practices in key areas in the mountains of Southwest China, Daikin's contribution will support CI-China's actions with local communities in the Mountains of Southwest China, a biodiversity hotspot, to adapt

and more »

More Herbicide, or More Innovative, Sustainable Farming? – The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)

More Herbicide, or More Innovative, Sustainable Farming?
The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)
These methods, collectively called agroecology, are not only more resilient to pest resistance, but also to climate change. They also can greatly reduce pollution from fertilizers, climate change emissions, and help maintain biodiversity, as we laid

Birds in the trees benefit coffee crops – ABC Science Online


ABC Science Online

Birds in the trees benefit coffee crops
ABC Science Online
Agroecology approach When trees and crops share the same land, both agriculture and biodiversity can benefit, suggests a new modelling study. The computer simulation of Jamaican coffee farms shows that trees planted in between the crop can support …

Yallahs/Hope River Watershed Management Project To Receive $12.4 Million – Government of Jamaica, Jamaica Information Service

Yallahs/Hope River Watershed Management Project To Receive $12.4 Million
Government of Jamaica, Jamaica Information Service
As at February 2014 technical documents in relation to agro-forestry and biology, biodiversity, economics of natural resources, rural development, hydrology, and carbon sequestration were prepared. Also, the project document is being prepared to be …

Discuss gardening with garden experts, at OIE April 10 – Kelowna Capital News

Discuss gardening with garden experts, at OIE April 10
Kelowna Capital News
He is also diversifying the farm with food forests and edible landscaping, conducting experiments based on Permaculture principles to increase biodiversity within the vineyard system and grow complimentary crops between the vineyard rows. Gabe has …