Cal Poly to host presentation on restoration agriculture – The San Luis Obispo Tribune

Cal Poly to host presentation on restoration agriculture
The San Luis Obispo Tribune
Cal Poly's Center for Sustainability will host a Nov. 2 presentation on restoration agriculture that will focus on topics such as agroforestry and water management for resilience in times of flood and drought. Mark Shepard, owner of New Forest Farm in …

Etelson: There are many ways to adapt to drought – East Oregonian (subscription)

Etelson: There are many ways to adapt to drought
East Oregonian (subscription)
Brush recharged his well using agro-ecology techniques that are appropriate in dry areas the world over. His innovations caught the attention of the U.S. Agency for International Development, which now contracts with Brush to teach people how they can …

and more »

Etelson: There are many ways for farmers to adapt to drought – East Oregonian (subscription)

Etelson: There are many ways for farmers to adapt to drought
East Oregonian (subscription)
Brush recharged his well using agro-ecology techniques that are appropriate in dry areas the world over. His innovations caught the attention of the U.S. Agency for International Development, which now contracts with Brush to teach people how they can …

and more »

Native shrubs: a simple fix for drought-stricken crops in Sub-Saharan Africa – The Conversation US

Native shrubs: a simple fix for drought-stricken crops in Sub-Saharan Africa
The Conversation US
In some other agroforestry systems where crops are grown in association with trees, the trees can outcompete the crops for water and reduce the growth and yield of the crops nearby. In our work, we investigated a process called hydraulic lift, also

Drought of Sight, Drought of Mind: Agroecology, not Amnesia, to Survive the … – The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)


The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)

Drought of Sight, Drought of Mind: Agroecology, not Amnesia, to Survive the
The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)
Do you remember: (a) Where the Olympic Games were held in 2012? (b) the name of the hurricane that devastated the East Coast that year? (c) who won the 2012 World Series? (d) What percent of the US was covered by the 2012 drought? or (e) out of the …

The Real Deal with the California Drought- San Francisco Permaculture Guild … – Bay Area Indymedia

The Real Deal with the California Drought- San Francisco Permaculture Guild
Bay Area Indymedia
For this month's gathering, the SF Permaculture Guild is hosting a FREE, public, interactive discussion on the California Drought! Come find out the real deal with the current water crisis in California. We'll spend an evening discussing root causes

Healthy soils, resilient farms

Innovative farmers and ranchers have, for generations, deliberately invested in building soil health. And this year — with the UN’s International Year of Soils and implementation of California's Healthy Soil Initiative well underway — we'll be pressing policymakers to turn innovation for healthy soil into standard practice.

The timing could not be better. Widespread implementation of practices that build and protect soil health is the only certain thing that will ensure farmers’ ability to both mitigate and adapt to worsening conditions associated with climate change. California's historic drought provides a dramatic case in point.

read more

Report from the Field | Quintana Roo

CAN Associate Director Heather Putnam recently visited the Zona Maya in Quintana Roo, Mexico to meet with women’s groups working with CAN and the Intercultural Maya University of Quintana Roo (UIMQRoo) to improve household food security and sovereignty in a two year project funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Here is her report from the field.

I traveled with Robin Pacheco, a project field technician, and three UIMQRoo students working in the field, to four of the six rural communities we are working with in the Zona Maya. The goal of the collaborative project between CAN and UIMQRoo is to improve household food security and nutrition by promoting increased production diversity (more vegetables and protein sources) and income diversification.  The project team on the ground make up of professors, field technicians, and students works directly with small groups of indigenous Maya women in the communities to strengthen traditional and agroecological food production practices, establish direct market channels between the women’s groups and local and regional venues like restaurants and markets, and also to ensure the long-term sustainability of the women’s groups themselves to operate these enterprises.

Our first stop was the community of Kancabchen, a community that was recently integrated into the project in October 2014. The eight women there established their vegetable gardens in October, and have now expanded their home production from yams, beans, and tomatoes to include habanero chile, green chiles, Maya squash, cilantro, radishes, and cucumbers. They told me that they were happy to have these products available right behind their houses for their families’ tables. Lidia Moo Poot, the president of the women’s organization, told me “Now we can have confidence in what we eat and what it contains. Our children will grow up healthier.”

The women were were excited to have participated for the first time the previous Saturday in the monthly tianguis, or farmers market, organized by UIMQRoo in José Mariá Morelos , where they enjoyed telling consumers there about their agroecologically grown produce. The women are looking forward to getting more training in the production of organic fertilizers, and to completing the fences around their gardens to keep animals out. One challenge that is worrisome is the unseasonal drought that is affecting production; the rains should have arrived in the middle of March, but as of the end of April still had not. We talked about the need to install water catchment systems to ensure that families could continue to produce diverse nutritious foods throughout the year, even as climate change brings more seasonal drought.

I also visited the communities of Candelaria, Bulukax, and Tabasco and spoke with the women’s groups there. The women in Candelaria are expanding their chicken and egg production through the project and are anticipating have enough hens producing enough eggs to bring to market in about six months. In the meantime they will be working with the team at UIMQRoo to establish relationships with buyers who will value the organic production and healthiness of their eggs.  In Bulukax and Tabasco my conversations with the women’s groups were dominated by their worries about water — they are affected not only by the drought, but by salty groundwater or chlorinated municipal water, both unfit for irrigation.  These conversations only reinforced by understanding of the urgency of focusing on ways to improve water access; any changes we hope to make in increasing the availability of healthy and nutritious foods year round will depend on water.

Beijing Begins Cottonwood Control through Injecting Medicine – CRIENGLISH.com


CRIENGLISH.com

Beijing Begins Cottonwood Control through Injecting Medicine
CRIENGLISH.com
These trees were chosen for their ability to thrive through resistance to the cold, droughts, flooding, poor soil conditions as well as pests and insects. Willow trees have been used across China for a number of means, including timber production

Drought Turns a Light on Farming Methods – Santa Barbara Independent


Santa Barbara Independent

Drought Turns a Light on Farming Methods
Santa Barbara Independent
Far away in Malawi, the Soils, Food and Healthy Communities project (with which I've had the privilege of collaborating) has taught agroecological methods in hundreds of Malawian villages over the last 15 years, and the results have been impressive.

What’s All that White Stuff?: A Brief History of Cottonwood Poplars in Beijing – The Beijinger (blog)

What's All that White Stuff?: A Brief History of Cottonwood Poplars in Beijing
The Beijinger (blog)
… cold, droughts, flooding, poor soil conditions as well as pests and insects i.e. perfect for Beijing, and had been used across China previously for a number of means, including timber production, agroforestry and for the protection of ecological

Christian Reformed Church Takes ‘Go and See’ Attitude on Climate Disruption … – Christian Post


Christian Post

Christian Reformed Church Takes 'Go and See' Attitude on Climate Disruption
Christian Post
People on the ground in Kenya just can't miss the effects of extreme weather afflicting the country: desperate farmers turning to conservation agriculture and agroforestry to deal with the onslaught of droughts; slum dwellers in Nairobi's enormous

Green entrepreneurship: Empowering farmers for sustainable future – Zambia Daily Mail


Zambia Daily Mail

Green entrepreneurship: Empowering farmers for sustainable future
Zambia Daily Mail
Mr Shenton cited Niger's successful reforestation scheme as an example of how agroforestry and green farming can help improve farmers' yields as well as improve soil cover and water retention. Following a bad drought in Niger in 1984, farmers who still

Central America’s food security threatened by drought – Deutsche Welle


Deutsche Welle

Central America's food security threatened by drought
Deutsche Welle
But now local populations are being encouraged to arm themselves in the fight for food security by diversifying their crops and engaging in climate smart practices such as agroforestry. Withered maize plantation in Honduras (Photo: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0:.

Contrasting decay rates of freshwater bivalves’ shells: Aquatic versus terrestrial habitats

Publication date: March 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters, Volume 51
Author(s): M.I. Ilarri , A.T. Souza , R. Sousa
Freshwater flow regimes are particularly vulnerable to global climate change with changes to the volume and regime of water contributing to global declines in freshwater biodiversity. Droughts or floods can cause massive mortalities of freshwater bivalves, facilitating the accumulation of shells in the aquatic but also in adjacent terrestrial habitats. In order to fully understand the long term impact of these massive mortality events, it is important to assess how bivalve shells persist in the environment. Given that, the present study aimed at studying the shell decays of four different bivalve species ( Anodonta anatina , Corbicula fluminea , Potomida littoralis and Unio delphinus ) in aquatic (i.e. river) versus terrestrial (i.e. sand soil) habitats. Shell decay rates were significantly different among species and habitats. In the aquatic habitat the shell decay rates varied among species, with the native species A . anatina , which have the largest and thinnest shell, showing the highest decay rate. Alternatively, in the terrestrial habitat the shell decay rates were more even among species and not related to a particular shell feature or morphology, with the native U . delphinus showing the fastest decay. The shell decay rates were 6 to 12 times higher in aquatic than in the terrestrial habitat. These results suggest that bivalve shells can persist for long periods of time on both habitats (but mainly in terrestrial), which may perhaps trigger significant changes on the ecosystem structure and functioning.

New data on the zoogeography of Aphanius sophiae (Teleostei: Cyprinodontidae) in the Central Zagros (Southwest Iran)

Publication date: Available online 12 December 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Zeinab Gholami , Hamid Reza Esmaeili , Bettina Reichenbacher
The clade of the Iranian freshwater Aphanius species from endorheic and exorheic drainage basins contains three subclades, of which the A. sophiae subclade with seven species is the most specious one. Recently, two previously not known populations of Aphanius were discovered in two isolated basins; one in the Arjan Wetland (Helleh subbasin), and the other in the Semirom spring (Karun Basin), both are located in the Central Zagros Mountains (SW Iran). The objective of this study is to investigate their taxonomic status, to elucidate their phylogenetic relationships and to contribute to future conservation strategies and habitat management of the freshwater species of Aphanius in Iran. Methods include analysis of genetic data based on mtDNA ( cyt b ), combined with meristics, morphometrics, scale sizes (J-indices) and otolith data. The results based on cyt b clearly indicate that two species are present in the Arjan Wetland, one is closely related to A. sophiae (currently thought to be restricted to the Kor Basin), the other represents A. shirini (previously only known from its type locality Paselari spring). However, significant phenotypic differences are not present between these two species. The second population from the Semirom spring is sister to A. sophiae (Kor Basin) according to cyt b data, but differs significantly from this species with regard to the phenotype. The presence of A. shirini in the Arjan Wetland is most likely be explained by man-made introduction because of the recent droughts. The similarity of the two species present in the Arjan Wetland may be due to phenotypic plasticity, but also hybridization could have played a role. The isolation of populations of A. sophiae is discussed in the context of the active geological history and climate change, and it is likely that their divergence happened in the Early or Middle Holocene (c. 11,700–4,000 y. ago). The presence of A. sophiae in the Helleh subbasin and Karun Basin extends the currently known zoogeographic range of this species, which previously has only been reported from the Kor Basin. Such knowledge is important for future conservation strategies and habitat management.

Africa Economy: Africa’s orphaned crops slowly bounce back under scientists … – Shanghai Daily (subscription)

Africa Economy: Africa's orphaned crops slowly bounce back under scientists
Shanghai Daily (subscription)
"The crops are more nutritious and drought resistant than many of the large commodity crops," the Director General of World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) Tony Simon told Xinhua in an interview late on Thursday. Simon revealed that due to their resilience

The Dirt on Dirt: 5 Things You Should Know About Soil – National Geographic


National Geographic

The Dirt on Dirt: 5 Things You Should Know About Soil
National Geographic
Inca terracing practices and agroforestry on the Polynesian island of Tikopia are on the short list of exceptions. 3. Good soil usage helps prevent droughts. During recent droughts in the western U.S., farmers who used no-till practices—for example

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming – Daily Democrat

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming
Daily Democrat
Martha Brown, principal editor at the UCSC Center for Agroecology, agreed. "You have to have pretty specific climates and soil types to do it," she said. "You can't just say let's replace all irrigated farms with dry farming." A drought can hurt dry

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Martha Brown, principal editor at the UCSC Center for Agroecology, agreed. "You have to have pretty specific climates and soil types to do it," she said. "You can't just say let's replace all irrigated farms with dry farming." A drought can hurt dry

and more »

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming – Monterey County Herald

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming
Monterey County Herald
Martha Brown, principal editor at the UCSC Center for Agroecology, agreed. "You have to have pretty specific climates and soil types to do it," she said. "You can't just say let's replace all irrigated farms with dry farming." A drought can hurt dry

5 things we can do to better ensure food security – Devex

5 things we can do to better ensure food security
Devex
The combined expertise of AIRCA centers cover a large spectrum of the research for development continuum including agro-biodiversity, agroforestry, integrated pest management, drought-tolerant crops, natural resource management and the conservation …

Explaining the “Hungry Farmer Paradox”

Most of the world’s food insecure people live in marginal rural environments. A recent study with coffee producers in northern Nicaragua’s highlands helps explain this “hungry farmer paradox.” These small-scale farmers experienced an average of three months of seasonal hunger over the year studied. Although cash income helped alleviate food scarcity, households that produced more subsistence crops, especially corn and tree fruits, reported still shorter periods of food scarcity. Meanwhile, farmers that used several commonly promoted environmentally friendly farming practices reported no discernible impacts on seasonal hunger.

In an article published in Global Environmental Change, Santa Clara University researchers, including Chris Bacon (Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences), Bill Sundstrom (Department of Economics), and two recently graduated Environmental Studies and Sciences students Ian Dougherty (now with the United Farm Workers Foundation) and Rica Santos (now with the National Council for Science and the Environment), concur with previous studies finding that several factors influence farmer food insecurity, including: (1) annual cycles of precipitation and rising maize prices during the lean months; (2) inter annual droughts and periodic storms; and (3) the long-term inability of coffee harvests and prices to provide sufficient income.

This work identifies the need for balancing coffee production with food production and improving exchange systems to protect farmers from adverse seasonal price fluctuations. It also considers a participatory initiative that uses fair trade cooperatives to increase rural food access through the re-localization of food distribution networks, sustainable agriculture training, and improved food storage. Although crop loss from coffee leaf rust contributes an additional challenge, these and other integrated strategies hold the potential to reduce threats to food security, livelihoods, and biodiversity.

Chris Bacon and Ernesto Mendez are CAN affiliate researchers; Maria Eugenia Flores Gomez is the CAN project manager for the Las Segovias project

* Bacon, C. M., Sundstrom, W. A., Flores Gómez, M. E., Ernesto Méndez, V., Santos, R., Goldoftas, B., & Dougherty, I. (2014). Explaining the ‘hungry farmer paradox’: Smallholders and fair trade cooperatives navigate seasonality and change in Nicaragua’s corn and coffee markets. Global Environmental Change, 25 (2014) 133–149

Author Affiliations

Christopher M. Bacon, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

William A. Sundstrom, Department of Economics, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA

 María Eugenia Flores Gómez, Community Agroecology Network, 595 Franklin Street, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA

 Ernesto Méndez, Environmental Program and Plant and Soil Science Department, University of Vermont,
The Bittersweet – 153 South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, USA

 Rica Santos, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

 Barbara Goldoftas, International Development, Community, & Environment Department, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610, USA

 Ian Dougherty, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

Critics of Gates’ ag programs bring the battle to Seattle – The Seattle Times

Critics of Gates' ag programs bring the battle to Seattle
The Seattle Times
During a recent drought, neighbors who relied on chemical fertilizer lost most of their crops, while she reaped a bounty of sorghum, corn and millet using what are called agroecological methods — natural pest control, organic fertilizer and locally

X is for Xeriscaping – World Development Movement (press release)


World Development Movement (press release)

X is for Xeriscaping
World Development Movement (press release)
Although it is mainly used to create efficient and drought-resistant gardens, rather than to produce food as such, it borrows from some of the agroecological techniques used across arid and semi-arid parts of Africa by using methods to increase soil

Viewpoints: Scientists are rising to the challenges of drought – Sacramento Bee

Viewpoints: Scientists are rising to the challenges of drought
Sacramento Bee
With its roots in crop science, agroecology draws on other disciplines, including ecology and the social sciences, to broaden our understanding of agriculture as part of a larger environmental and societal context. Agroecology considers the needs of

California drought: Reimagining sustainable landscape with permaculture – allvoices

California drought: Reimagining sustainable landscape with permaculture
allvoices
The principles of permaculture can be best understood as a process grounded in ethics and design principles and practice to enhance human habitation not only in agriculture, but also ecological building, technology, education and economics associated …

California drought: Reimagining the landscape with principles of permaculture – allvoices

California drought: Reimagining the landscape with principles of permaculture
allvoices
If some modern farming folk claim to have invented permaculture as a form of land management, they are not being totally honest. Permaculture is one of the oldest, natural forms of agricultural practices originated by ancient, indigenous people

Explaining the “Hungry Farmer Paradox” | New Article


<--break->Most of the world’s food insecure people live in marginal rural environments. A recent study with coffee producers in northern Nicaragua’s highlands helps explain this “hungry farmer paradox.” These small-scale farmers experienced an average of three months of seasonal hunger over the year studied. Although cash income helped alleviate food scarcity, households that produced more subsistence crops, especially corn and tree fruits, reported still shorter periods of food scarcity. Meanwhile, farmers that used several commonly promoted environmentally friendly farming practices reported no discernible impacts on seasonal hunger. 

In an article published in Global Environmental Change*, a team of researchers, including CAN-affiliated researchers Chris Bacon (Professor, Santa Clara University) and Ernesto Méndez (Professor, University of Vermont) and CAN’s project manager for the Las Segovias project, Maria Eugenia Flores Gomez, concur with previous studies finding that several factors influence farmer food insecurity, including: (1) annual cycles of precipitation and rising maize prices during the lean months; (2) inter annual droughts and periodic storms; and (3) the long-term inability of coffee harvests and prices to provide sufficient income. 

This work identifies the need for balancing coffee production with food production and improving exchange systems to protect farmers from adverse seasonal price fluctuations. It also considers a participatory initiative that uses fair trade cooperatives to increase rural food access through the re-localization of food distribution networks, sustainable agriculture training, and improved food storage. Although crop loss from coffee leaf rust contributes an additional challenge, these and other integrated strategies hold the potential to reduce threats to food security, livelihoods, and biodiversity.

* Bacon, C. M., Sundstrom, W. A., Flores Gómez, M. E., Ernesto Méndez, V., Santos, R., Goldoftas, B., & Dougherty, I. (2014). “Explaining the ‘hungry farmer paradox’: Smallholders and fair trade cooperatives navigate seasonality and change in Nicaragua’s corn and coffee markets.” Global Environmental Change, 25 (2014) 133–149

 

Open letter to next Prime Minister: India’s future depends on food and water … – Daily News & Analysis


Daily News & Analysis

Open letter to next Prime Minister: India's future depends on food and water
Daily News & Analysis
This can be combined with concerted efforts to introduce sustainable and drought resilient agriculture practices such as agroforestry. Agroforestry also sequesters additional carbon and is an approved clean development mechanism. The farmers can thus

The ‘Organic Life Guru’ Teaches Us Joys of Drought Saturday at DVC – Patch.com

The 'Organic Life Guru' Teaches Us Joys of Drought Saturday at DVC
Patch.com
Best-selling author and permaculture expert Toby Hemenway is the featured guest speaker Saturday in a dinner and lecture presented by Sustainable Contra Costa. "An Evening with Toby Hemenway 'Joys of Drought, Living with Nature's Cycles'" is April 5 …

Desperately seeking solutions to worst drought in decades in Brazil – The Guardian


The Guardian

Desperately seeking solutions to worst drought in decades in Brazil
The Guardian
temperature rise in the semi-arid region by the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, the University of California and Embrapa was the starting point for the Adapta Sertão project, which is testing a production model based on agroforestry with a

Cultivating resilience to feed the world

Crazy weather we’ve been having this winter: monster snowstorms across New England, record-breaking freezes in the Midwest, drought, wildfires (in January!) and weirdly hot days in California. For many farmers across the country and around the world, all this extreme weather — on top of ever-intensifying environmental and economic stresses — is pushing them to their edge.

At the same time, a growing number of farmers and scientists are realizing that 1) continued reliance on the energy, water and chemical-intensive industrial model of agriculture is simply no longer an option and 2) our most robust response to today’s converging stresses lies in cultivating resilience and food democracy.

read more

Drought focus of organic farming forum – Albuquerque Journal (subscription)

Drought focus of organic farming forum
Albuquerque Journal (subscription)
Land,” “Chasing Chiles,” and “Renewing America's Food Traditions;” and Helen Atthowe, author of “Reduced Tillage in Organic Vegetable Production: Success, Challenges,” and a series of videos, “New Directions Conservation Farming and Agroecology.”.

Expanded Research Puts Global Food Security on the Horizon – Voice of America

Expanded Research Puts Global Food Security on the Horizon
Voice of America
He says a lot of work is going on in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Sahel region, where drought and climate conditions are much more severe, agroforestry is being incorporated into the production of maize production. In looking ahead into the year 2014, 

Climate prediction tools show role of oceans in Amazon drought – Thomson Reuters Foundation

Climate prediction tools show role of oceans in Amazon drought
Thomson Reuters Foundation
For further information on the topics discussed in this article, please contact Miguel Pinedo-Vasquez at m.pinedo-vasquez@cgiar.org. This work forms part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry. TOPICAL NEWS. Topical news 

and more »

Climate prediction tools show role of oceans in Amazon drought – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Climate prediction tools show role of oceans in Amazon drought
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
India's western Ghats region. For further information on the topics discussed in this article, please contact Miguel Pinedo-Vasquez at m.pinedo-vasquez@cgiar.org. This work forms part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

Population traits of invasive bleak Alburnus alburnus between different habitats in Iberian fresh waters

Publication date: Available online 24 December 2013
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): David Almeida , Paris V. Stefanoudis , David H. Fletcher , Carlos Rangel , Eduardo da Silva
The bleak Alburnus alburnus (L.) is a cyprinid native to most of Europe, mainly inhabiting lentic environments. This fish species is a successful invader in the Iberian Peninsula, where it was first introduced to reservoirs as forage fish during the 1990s. Bleaks threaten the highly endemic Iberian fish fauna by means of trophic competition and hybridization. Yet, little is known about the environmental biology of bleaks in the Iberian Peninsula, particularly far from impounded waters. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare seasonal and gender variation of size structure, body condition and reproductive investment of bleaks between different habitats. Only sexually mature bleaks were seasonally collected and examined from the River Gévora and the Sierra Brava Reservoir (southwestern Spain) to assess more in-depth the adaptive capacity at the population level and the subsequent invasiveness. Bleak was an abundant species in the fish assemblages of both habitat types (i.e. river and reservoir). The proportion of smaller mature bleaks was lower in the river than the reservoir during spring and the opposite pattern was observed during winter. Both male and females were larger in the river during the breeding season in the study areas (i.e. spring), as well as with higher body condition and reproductive investment. These findings suggest that bleaks enhance their reproduction rate in the river to compensate for higher mortality in this habitat, where environmental conditions may be harsher due to the winter floods and summer droughts typical of Mediterranean water courses. Overall results highlight the high degree of plasticity in population traits of the bleak in the Iberian Peninsula, which will surely aid its ability to adapt to a wide variety of Mediterranean ecosystems, including lentic and lotic environments. Consequently, this invasive fish may pose a serious risk for the highly valuable fauna of Mediterranean Europe.

Permaculture in Practice: A tale of two drought strategies – Santa Fe New Mexican.com

Permaculture in Practice: A tale of two drought strategies
Santa Fe New Mexican.com
Permaculture in Practice: A tale of two drought strategies. Story · Comments. Print: Create a hardcopy of this page; Font Size: Default font size: Larger font size. Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 7:00 am. Permaculture in Practice: A tale of two

and more »

Professor leads project to breed beans resistant to climate stresses

With support from a $5 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development, an international team led by Jonathan Lynch, professor of plant nutrition in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, will establish the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Climate-Resilient Beans. The project will employ novel techniques to accelerate breeding programs for common bean aimed at conferring traits that can increase yield under heat and drought stress.

Farmer clubs leading way for climate change adaptation in Central India’s semi … – Newstrack India

Farmer clubs leading way for climate change adaptation in Central India's semi
Newstrack India
Farmers receive training on water efficient irrigation practices like drip and sprinkler irrigation, use of drought resistant seed varieties, organic farming, line sowing, dry sowing, agroforestry, horticulture and integrated pest management. Positive

and more »

Genetic Technology’s Answer to A Major Insect Pest – The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists


The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists

Genetic Technology's Answer to A Major Insect Pest
The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists
As my colleague Mardi Mellon detailed in her recent blog post, Monsanto's drought tolerance gene is also overshadowed by cover crops, part of the sound agroecological farming systems that need to replace our current unsustainable practices. The biotech 

Genetic Technology’s Answer to A Major Insect Pest – The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)


The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)

Genetic Technology's Answer to A Major Insect Pest
The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists (blog)
As my colleague Mardi Mellon detailed in her recent blog post, Monsanto's drought tolerance gene is also overshadowed by cover crops, part of the sound agroecological farming systems that need to replace our current unsustainable practices. The biotech 

Livestock Production Is Not A Solution To Global Warming – PlanetSave.com

Livestock Production Is Not A Solution To Global Warming
PlanetSave.com
Many desertified areas, including those in semi-arid regions would be much healthier and more productive if restored in a resource- efficient manner with indigenous drought-resistant plants, agroforestry, implementing terracing and other organic

Vietnamese scholars win three US scientific research awards – VietNamNet Bridge

Vietnamese scholars win three US scientific research awards
VietNamNet Bridge
In 2013, USAID and the NSF have awarded 54 new research projects in 32 countries totaling nearly 7.5 million USD to collaborate on areas such as agroforestry, groundwater purification, biodiversity, volcano risk reduction, and drought and climate change.

Living Laboratory for Coping with Drought in Brazil – Independent European Daily Express

Living Laboratory for Coping with Drought in Brazil
Independent European Daily Express
Another surprise is the breadth of knowledge Manto displays; he calls himself a "family farmer in transition toward agroecology." At the age of 40 he has become well-known for his inventive solutions for coping with the periodic droughts of Brazil's

and more »

UN Calls For Global Action On Drought – Nigerian Observer

UN Calls For Global Action On Drought
Nigerian Observer
He made reference to the achievements of the village of Batodi in Niger, where five million hectares of land were restored through agro forestry. As a result of that effort, the water table in the area rose by 14 metres. Gnacadja said that the most
United Nations calls for global action on drought All about feed


ON WORLD DAY, UN OFFICIALS URGE GLOBAL ACTION TO INCREASE EIN News (press release)

all 2 news articles »

New York: UN chief urges global action to increase response to drought – Afrique en Ligue


Voice of America

New York: UN chief urges global action to increase response to drought
Afrique en Ligue
The UN official also pointed to the achievements of the village of Batodi in Niger, where 5 million hectares of land were restored through agro-forestry, which he described as an example of progress. 'As a result of the restoration, the water table
United Nations calls for global action on drought agprofessional.com


Ban Ki Moon urges governments to take drought threat seriously Responding to Climate Change
7,8 million tonnes of soil nutrients lost yearly — Nhema The Zimbabwe Standard

all 32 news articles »

Global Action Needed to Increase Response to Drought – Scoop.co.nz (press release)


Voice of America

Global Action Needed to Increase Response to Drought
Scoop.co.nz (press release)
Mr. Gnacadja pointed to the achievements of the village of Batodi in Niger, where 5 million hectares of land were restored through agroforestry, as an example of progress. As a result of the restoration, the water table rose by 14 metres. “The most
United Nations calls for global action on drought agprofessional.com


Ban Ki Moon urges governments to take drought threat seriously Responding to Climate Change
7,8 million tonnes of soil nutrients lost yearly — Nhema The Zimbabwe Standard

all 32 news articles »

On World Day, UN officials urge global action to increase response to drought – UN News Centre


UN News Centre

On World Day, UN officials urge global action to increase response to drought
UN News Centre
Mr. Gnacadja pointed to the achievements of the village of Batodi in Niger, where 5 million hectares of land were restored through agroforestry, as an example of progress. As a result of the restoration, the water table rose by 14 metres. “The most

Ban Ki Moon urges governments to take drought threat seriously – Responding to Climate Change

Ban Ki Moon urges governments to take drought threat seriously
Responding to Climate Change
Gnacadja hailed the achievements of the village of Batodi in Niger, where he said five million hectares of land were restored through agroforestry, resulting in a rise of the water table by 14 metres. “The most affected communities are not standing by

UN drought chief: ‘famine dehumanizes us, but it is not a fate’ – Responding to Climate Change

UN drought chief: 'famine dehumanizes us, but it is not a fate'
Responding to Climate Change
While we pondered and planned the actions to take in the Sahel, for instance, affected communities in Niger and Burkina Faso invested in agroforestry and protected over 5 million hectares of farmland from 1975. In the latter half of this period

UNCCD chief: droughts dehumanize us all, but they are not a fate – Responding to Climate Change


Responding to Climate Change

UNCCD chief: droughts dehumanize us all, but they are not a fate
Responding to Climate Change
While we pondered and planned the actions to take in the Sahel, for instance, affected communities in Niger and Burkina Faso invested in agroforestry and protected over 5 million hectares of farmland from 1975. In the latter half of this period

Kenyan MPs to Champion Rural Women’s Influence On Climate Policy – AllAfrica.com

Kenyan MPs to Champion Rural Women's Influence On Climate Policy
AllAfrica.com
women have begun boosting their incomes by planting drought-tolerant crops, growing indigenous vegetables for nutritional purposes – especially for children and people living with HIV/AIDS – and adopting green farming practices such as agroforestry.

Kenyan MPs to champion rural women’s influence on climate policy – PreventionWeb (press release)

Kenyan MPs to champion rural women's influence on climate policy
PreventionWeb (press release)
women have begun boosting their incomes by planting drought-tolerant crops, growing indigenous vegetables for nutritional purposes – especially for children and people living with HIV/AIDS – and adopting green farming practices such as agroforestry.

Kenyan MPs to champion rural women’s influence on climate policy – Reuters AlertNet (blog)

Kenyan MPs to champion rural women's influence on climate policy
Reuters AlertNet (blog)
women have begun boosting their incomes by planting drought-tolerant crops, growing indigenous vegetables for nutritional purposes – especially for children and people living with HIV/AIDS – and adopting green farming practices such as agroforestry.

Trees on farms: challenging conventional agricultural practice – The Guardian

Trees on farms: challenging conventional agricultural practice
The Guardian
The practice was first introduced in Niger in the 1980s on a small experimental scale in response to widespread drought and land degradation, and a new publication by the World Agroforestry Centre describes how transformational this straightforward

Transplanting my potted citrus trees

IMG_6670_ed_lMy two citrus trees, a Mandarin orange and a Meyer lemon, could not stay forever in the half-wine-barrel pots. This year it became clear that it was time to replant them. The orange, in particular, was looking very weak. So, yesterday, after digging a couple of holes in my front yard, a friend came by and we moved them both.

IMG_6671_ed_lIt was an improvised process, but we figured out how to make it work without hurting either the trees or ourselves. Those ancient technologies of the wheel (in this case a wheel barrow) and the inclined plane (a 2×12 plank) came in very handy. Upon discovering that the bottoms of the pots had rotted out, we slid the trees down the plank off my deck, then tilted the barrels on their sides and pulled the trees out. IMG_6674_ed_lTilting the trees back upright onto the plank, we lifted them to the wheelbarrow then slid them off the plank. After wheeling them to the front yard, they slid neatly out of the wheelbarrow into their respective holes. Mission accomplished!

IMG_6675_ed_lTransplanting these two trees marks a watershed moment in my gardening. Up to now, my back yard has been for food production and my front yard a drought-tolerant ornamental garden. For the first time, I have planted a food crop in my front yard. The primary effect of this is that I will now have to begin doing some irrigating in my front yard. With these trees making a beachhead for food crops, I have to wonder: Will I soon be growing other food crops in my front yard?IMG_6676_ed_lIMG_6677_ed_lIMG_6679_ed_l

Agricultural officer call for adoption of efficient farming methods in Kenya – Newstime Africa

Agricultural officer call for adoption of efficient farming methods in Kenya
Newstime Africa
“In order to restore our food productivity, our farmers must start adopting farming technologies like agroforestry,use the minimum tillage machinery, greenhouses and plant drought resistant crops among others,” added the officer. He further urged the

Pine Nuts Rate Foie Gras Prices as Bugs to Drought Cut Harvests – Businessweek

Pine Nuts Rate Foie Gras Prices as Bugs to Drought Cut Harvests
Businessweek
Costly pine nuts also mean grafted orchards and agroforestry systems become profitable, Mutke said. “Supply of pine nuts is almost assured,” Sharashkin said. “The only question is the price.” To contact the reporter on this story: Rudy Ruitenberg in

and more »

Pine Nuts Rate Foie Gras Prices as Bugs to Drought Cut Harvests – Bloomberg


Bloomberg

Pine Nuts Rate Foie Gras Prices as Bugs to Drought Cut Harvests
Bloomberg
Costly pine nuts also mean grafted orchards and agroforestry systems become profitable, Mutke said. “Supply of pine nuts is almost assured,” Sharashkin said. “The only question is the price.” To contact the reporter on this story: Rudy Ruitenberg in

and more »

The lawn police are at it again

Every year at least one local jurisdiction decides that growing tomatoes in your front yard violates someone’s sensibilities.  The year has just started and we already have a new contender in the My Lawn is Prettier than Your Tomatoes nonsense. Mark Bittman of the New York Times has a column discussing some of the bigger issues, highlighting a town in Florida that is harassing gardeners for growing food in their front yard. I’m so glad I live in Oakland where so many people have taken out lawns and replaced them with drought tolerant and food producing plants.

Cherokee County Food Policy Council to hold garden workshops – Cherokee Phoenix

Cherokee County Food Policy Council to hold garden workshops
Cherokee Phoenix
The agenda will focus primarily for the home garden, including garden planning for seed saving, “Eating What You Grow,” drought, weed and pest control, an introduction to permaculture and composting. A second workshop will be held at 9 a.m. on Feb.

Scientists at MU gathering discuss past drought, farm impact – Springfield News-Leader

Scientists at MU gathering discuss past drought, farm impact
Springfield News-Leader
Among the topics discussed at the agroforestry symposium were short- and long-term climate forecasts that indicate an increased frequency in droughts in coming years, said Christopher Anderson, assistant director of the Iowa State University climate

MU Center for Agroforestry to host weather disaster symposium – Columbia Missourian

MU Center for Agroforestry to host weather disaster symposium
Columbia Missourian
COLUMBIA — The MU Center for Agroforestry will focus on understanding and adapting to extreme weather events during its Fourth Annual Agroforestry Symposium. The symposium, "Floods and Droughts: Agriculture, Agroforestry and Natural Resources in

Time for a rethink? Getting smart about politics on climate change and agriculture – Institute of Development Studies


Institute of Development Studies

Time for a rethink? Getting smart about politics on climate change and agriculture
Institute of Development Studies
In Malawi, strategies such as conservation agriculture, drought resistant varieties and hybrid seeds and agroforestry are being promoted by particular players – NGOs and donors – in support of 'climate smart agriculture'. Yet the state clearly also has

Does agroecology have a part to play in a new Green Revolution?

Cuba has introduced a large-scale conversion to agroecology, and farmers have learned to drought-proof their farms as a result. Photograph: Desmond Boylan/REUTERS

By Caspar van Vark
The Guardian Professional, Tuesday 27 November 2012

The food price rises of 2007-8 triggered some alarming forecasts about the future of food. By 2050, said the FAO, there would be another 2 billion mouths to feed. Production would need to increase by 70%.

read more

Research shows legume trees can fertilize and stabilize maize fields, generate … – Phys.Org

Research shows legume trees can fertilize and stabilize maize fields, generate
Phys.Org
Inserting rows of "fertilizer trees" into maize fields, known as agroforestry, can help farmers across sub-Saharan Africa cope with the impacts of drought and degraded soils, according to a 12-year-long study by researchers at the World Agroforestry

Research shows legume trees can fertilize and stabilize maize fields, generate … – Science Codex

Research shows legume trees can fertilize and stabilize maize fields, generate
Science Codex
NAIROBI, KENYA (15 October 2012)—Inserting rows of "fertilizer trees" into maize fields, known as agroforestry, can help farmers across sub-Saharan Africa cope with the impacts of drought and degraded soils, according to a 12-year-long study by

and more »

Research shows legume trees can fertilize and stabilize maize fields, generate … – EurekAlert (press release)

Research shows legume trees can fertilize and stabilize maize fields, generate
EurekAlert (press release)
NAIROBI, KENYA (15 October 2012)—Inserting rows of "fertilizer trees" into maize fields, known as agroforestry, can help farmers across sub-Saharan Africa cope with the impacts of drought and degraded soils, according to a 12-year-long study by