Asia Plantation Capital Welcomes European Guests to its Latest Distillery and … – MarketWatch

Asia Plantation Capital Welcomes European Guests to its Latest Distillery and
MarketWatch
"At Asia Plantation Capital we are committed not only to producing agroforestry products of the highest natural quality," said Mr Steve Watts, CEO Asia Pacific, Asia Plantation Capital. "We also ensure sustainability in these crops, and we work hard to

Sustainable coffee and cocoa workshop helps growers – Peru this Week


Peru this Week

Sustainable coffee and cocoa workshop helps growers
Peru this Week
Many producers are part of a sustainable agroforestry initiative implemented by the Alternative Development Programme in Satipo (DAS) via the ProNaturaleza Foundation, with funding from the European Union and DEVIDA. The project helps producers to …

Anti-GMO protesters march against Monsanto in Burkina Faso – spyghana.com


spyghana.com

Anti-GMO protesters march against Monsanto in Burkina Faso
spyghana.com
Thousands activists of the collective citizenship for agro-ecology, of which many Europeans, took to the streets on Saturday at Ouagadougou to demonstrate against genetically modified organism (GMO) and the specialized GMO distribution multinational …

Newest news on bee-harming neonics

Guess what? Two more studies have confirmed that neonicotinoid insecticides (aka "neonics") are bad for bees. One study documented neonics' impacts on wild bees, which hasn't been looked at much to date. The second found that bees show a preference for neonic-laced food.

A third report from the European Academies Science Advisory Council underscores the importance of the ecosystem service provided by pollinators. The scientific case for taking action to protect bees and other pollinators from neonics just keeps getting stronger.

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Growers told to ‘start thinking as biologists’ – Horticulture Week


Horticulture Week

Growers told to 'start thinking as biologists'
Horticulture Week
'Agro-ecology' is complex. It's interesting, it's exciting." She explained that among new developments in the biopesticides market is the EU's PURE project, which is researching the use of sugars to stimulate defence mechanisms in plants. European …

Management options of invasive Elodea nuttallii and Elodea canadensis

Publication date: Available online 10 February 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Andreas Zehnsdorf , Andreas Hussner , Frank Eismann , Helmut Rönicke , Arnulf Melzer
Elodea nuttallii and Elodea canadensis , two invasive submerged and rooted aquatic macrophyte species, are receiving increasing attention for their rapid and lasting invasion of many freshwater habitats throughout Europe, Asia and Australia. This review summarizes the present scientific knowledge about means of controlling Elodea nuttallii and Elodea canadensis within of aquatic weed management programs. Both species exhibit high growth rates with a high tolerance to wide ranges of environmental conditions, low vulnerability to grazing and other stress factors, high distribution and reproduction potential, and relatively high resistance to common conventional aquatic weed management procedures. Possibilities for the further use of harvested Elodea biomass are presented and novel approaches to the improvement of the monitoring and management of Elodea plagues are discussed.

TTIP: Free trade for pesticides?

In this week's State of the Union address, President Obama clearly signaled his renewed commitment to push free trade agreements through Congress. But civil society organizations across the world are speaking out louder than ever in firm opposition to the secretive "Fast Track" negotiations of the two global trade agreements now on the table: the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

The TTIP is one of the latest agreements in the queue, currently in negotiation between the U.S. and the European Union (EU). Along with the TPP, TTIP is threatening international policy change that puts the interests of multinational corporations ahead of everything else, and strips away a slew of protections that social movements across the world have won in recent years.

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Determining useful benchmarks for the bioassessment of highly disturbed areas based on diatoms

Publication date: Available online 13 January 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Carmen L. Elias , Ana R. Calapez , Salomé F.P. Almeida , Maria J. Feio
Modern ecological assessments of running waters are based on the a priori definition of ecological benchmarks, given by reference-quality sites. Such benchmarks are established at the level of ecoregions, typologies, or site. Yet, in highly disturbed regions, such as coastal areas of European countries, the assessment of streams’ water quality based on the reference condition concept is very difficult, due to the lack of undisturbed sites. Among others, the reduced number of reference sites may have as a consequence the definition of imprecise ecological benchmarks. Here we tested the hypotheses that 1) the increase in the number of potential reference sites 2) the definition of more precise abiotic thresholds using the Least Disturbed Condition approach (LDC), and 3) the use of diatom assemblages, as the most ubiquitous element in lowland areas, would result in refinement and eventual sub-division of existing river types of a highly disturbed area, such as the Portuguese centre-western region. For this purpose, abiotic data characterising natural conditions of 55 sites from a littoral highly disturbed region were used in a hierarchical classification analysis that revealed the existence of three different sub-groups. In addition, a three-step approach was used to define thresholds for the pressure variables in LDC. Based on these new thresholds, sites in LDC were selected. A hierarchical classification performed to the LDC diatom spring assemblages revealed the existence of two sub-groups, concordant with two of the abiotic sub-groups. Several species contributed to the dissimilarity between the two sub-groups (e.g., Achnanthidium minutissimum and Karayevia oblongella ). Differences between the sub-groups were also found in the trait proportions of stalked species. New benchmark values for these two sub-groups, based on the scores of the official diatom index, the Indice de Polluo-sensibilité Spécifique (IPS), were different from the previous reference value used. Yet, no biological benchmark values were established for one of the groups due to the absence of sites in the LDC. Our study suggests that streambed substrate is an important characterisation variable in the river type definition and highlights that, in spite of the potential refinement in reference conditions and typology obtained, an alternative approach that does not require the use of reference sites should be explored in the future.

Human waterborne protozoan parasites in freshwater bivalves (Anodonta anatina and Unio tumidus) as potential indicators of fecal pollution in urban reservoir

Publication date: Available online 6 December 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Anna Słodkowicz-Kowalska , Anna C. Majewska , Piotr Rzymski , Łukasz Skrzypczak , Anna Werner
The presence of environmentally robust dispersive stages of intestinal protozoan parasites in waters represents an important public health threat since these pathogens have caused numerous outbreaks related to either drinking or recreational waters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts, Giardia and Blastocystis cysts, and microsporidian spores in mussels collected from municipal reservoir, Lake Malta (Poland, Europe). Two species of freshwater bivalves ( Anodonta anatina and Unio tumidus ) were tested for the enteropathogens. A direct wet smear and smears stained with chromotrope 2R, Ziehl-Neelsen and iron hematoxylin made from each pellet of the hemolymph, gills and gastrointestinal homogenates of mussels were examined microscopically. In the study the immunofluorescence antibody test kit MERIFLUOR Cryptosporidium/Giardia was also used for all bivalve samples. None of investigated parasites were found in U. tumidus . In A. anatina , Cryptosporidium oocysts and Blastocystis cysts were detected in 15.4 and 5.1% of mussel samples, respectively. The present results indicate contamination of Lake Malta with Cryptosporidium and Blastocystis , which is important from the point of view of public health threats because of different human uses of studied reservoir.

The status of freshwater pearl mussel in the Czech Republic: several successfully rejuvenated populations but the absence of natural reproduction

Publication date: Available online 24 November 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Ondřej P. Simon , Ivana Vaníčková , Michal Bílý , Karel Douda , Hana Patzenhauerová , Jaroslav Hruška , Alena Peltánová
The freshwater pearl mussel was historically abundant in many streams and rivers in the Elbe, Oder and Danube Basins in the Czech Republic, Central Europe. By the 21st century, the mussels had become extinct in the lower and middle altitudes, and current populations are only present near the upper limit of their natural range. The current population of this mussel is estimated to be only 1% of the historical abundance. The population decline was related to the negative impacts of pollution from industry, intense agriculture, forestry and sewage water. The freshwater pearl mussel habitat has also been impacted by watercourse regulations and has been fragmented by dams and weirs. All of these impacts have resulted in failure of the reproductive cycle; the last significant cohort of juveniles settled approximately 30-40 years ago. Therefore, this species is considered critically endangered, and an action plan was developed to conserve the populations in the Czech Republic. Special measures were conducted between 1984 and 2005 to improve the age structure of elderly populations. Fish infected with millions of glochidia were released in two locations, and over 50,000 captive-bred juveniles that were three to five years old were released in 7 locations. Only the latter approach resulted in a small number of subadults that gradually emerged from the substratum to the bottom surface, as confirmed by monitoring efforts. Despite simultaneous efforts to restore mussel habitat over the last 25 years, natural reproduction still does not occur in the Czech Republic. Therefore, complete restoration of oligotrophic streams is the key to the future presence and natural reproduction of freshwater pearl mussels in the Czech Republic.

At COP20: REDD+ emerging—or REDD+ emergency? – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)


Mongabay.com

At COP20: REDD+ emerging—or REDD+ emergency?
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
… Development Cooperation (Norad), the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), the European Union (EU), the United Kingdom, and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests Trees and Agroforestry, with financial support from the CGIAR …
CIFOR Explores REDD+ Lessons from Central Kalimantan IISD Reporting Services



all 9 news articles »

REDD+ on the ground: Unintended consequences in ‘a microcosm of the Amazon’ – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

REDD+ on the ground: Unintended consequences in 'a microcosm of the Amazon'
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
… Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad), the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), the European Union (EU), the United Kingdom, and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests Trees and Agroforestry, with financial support from …

Utilise space between tree rows, growers advised – Horticulture Week


Horticulture Week

Utilise space between tree rows, growers advised
Horticulture Week
Abacus Agriculture director, vice-chair of the European Agroforestry Federation and "simple farmer from Cambridgeshire" Stephen Briggs said field growers "rarely think more than 2ft above the ground or 1ft below it" but mixed growing systems "give you

Food and forests: Bolivia’s balancing act – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)


Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Food and forests: Bolivia's balancing act
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
This research was carried out as part of the Global Comparative Study on REDD+ and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and was supported in part by NORAD, AusAID, DFID, the European Commission, the Department for …

Responding to Climate Change from the Grassroots Up – Independent European Daily Express

Responding to Climate Change from the Grassroots Up
Independent European Daily Express
"I plan to mobilise at least 10,000 households in climate action that involves waste diversion, composting and diversified ecological farming,†said Weekes, who heads the Aquaponics, Aquaculture and Agro-Ecology Society of Antigua and Barbuda.

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Carrots or sticks? Balancing cost-effectiveness, equity in Brazil’s … – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)


Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Carrots or sticks? Balancing cost-effectiveness, equity in Brazil's
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
… Department for International Development, the European Commission, the Department for International Development Cooperation of Finland, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

Will the Upcoming Climate Summit be Another Talkathon? – Independent European Daily Express

Will the Upcoming Climate Summit be Another Talkathon?
Independent European Daily Express
Such approaches not only contribute to environmental and social problems but they also also undermine one of the most important social benefits of agroecology: reducing farmers’ dependence on external inputs. Yet CSA is touted as a positive

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Mexican beekeepers vs. Monsanto

Beekeepers and indigenous groups in the Mexican state of Yucatán recently won an important court decision against Monsanto. A district judge overturned Monsanto's permit for  commercial planting of RoundUp-ready soybeans in the state.

The judge found that "co-existence between honey production and GMO soybeans is not possible," given European restrictions on imports of honey contaminated with GMO pollen. The court also took regulators to task for ignoring the constitutional requirement to consult with indigenous groups on decisions affecting their territory.

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A typology for fish-based assessment of the ecological status of lowland lakes with description of the reference fish communities

Publication date: Available online 21 August 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): David Ritterbusch , Uwe Brämick , Thomas Mehner
We compared the potential of different lake typologies to discriminate fish communities in least disturbed sites. The typologies tested were based on morphometric and geographical descriptors. The best discrimination was achieved by distinguishing three lake types according to depth and mixis regime: polymictic lakes, stratified lakes with less than 30 m of maximum depth and deep, stratified lakes with maximum depths above 30 m. We conclude that the proposed typology is appropriate for a system to assess the ecological status of German lakes with the fish fauna according to the Water Framework Directive and might well be transferable to other European assessment systems. The fish communities in all lake types were similar and dominated by few fish species. Perch and roach were the most abundant ones, followed by ruffe, bream, rudd and pike. The fish communities in least disturbed sites might be used as reference conditions in future fish-based assessment systems.

European Federation of Animal Science will make a conference in Copenhagen – Agri.EU


Agri.EU

European Federation of Animal Science will make a conference in Copenhagen
Agri.EU
Following the most urgent issues of animal farming, the main theme of the meeting will be “Quality and sustainability in animal production” dealing with resource efficiency, animal welfare, diversification and agroecology aspects as well as product

Exposing Monsanto: Herbicide Linked to Birth Defects – the Vitamin A Connection – Truth-Out

Exposing Monsanto: Herbicide Linked to Birth Defects – the Vitamin A Connection
Truth-Out
The document is authored by eight experts from the fields of molecular genetics, agro-ecology, toxico-pathology, scientific ethics, ecological agriculture, plant genetics, public health and cell biology. This report, written primarily for a European

Intra- and interspecific variations in life strategies of Erpobdella octoculata and Erpobdella vilnensis in different habitats along the longitudinal gradient of stream

Publication date: July 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters, Volume 48
Author(s): Pavel Beracko , Alexandra Rogánska
Our study examines intra and interspecific variations in life histories, reproduction parameters, secondary production and feeding biology of two erpobdellid leech species ( Erpobdella octoculata and Erpobdella vilnensis ) across longitudinal gradient of streams. These species frequently cohabit in streams of Central Europe and present a very high niche overlap in terms of spatial distribution and trophic resources. In both species, a shift from biennial to annual life cycle was noted, as well as from iteroparity to semelparity. In general, annual erpobdellid populations invested more in reproduction than the biennial populations and E. octoculata invested more in reproduction than any E. vilnensis . The absolute individual growths of studied species were described by the von Bertalanffy growth model with seasonal oscillations. The highest values of daily growths (6.1–8.6% of dry mass per day) were noted during the first month after hatching. Annual production ranged for E. vilnensis from 3.48 to 10.01 g formalin mass m−2 year−1 and for E. octoculata from 11.29 to 19.29 g formalin mass m−2 year−1. The prey diversity and overlap of prey composition and potential prey resources of leeches indicate that, compared to older leeches, the younger leeches are more selective feeders.

Better information flows needed for REDD+ monitoring, report says – Thomson Reuters Foundation

Better information flows needed for REDD+ monitoring, report says
Thomson Reuters Foundation
This research was carried out as part of the Global Comparative Study on REDD+ and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and was supported in part by NORAD, AusAID, DFID, the European Commission, the Department for …

Better information flows needed for REDD+ monitoring, report says – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Better information flows needed for REDD+ monitoring, report says
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
This research was carried out as part of the Global Comparative Study on REDD+ and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and was supported in part by NORAD, AusAID, DFID, the European Commission, the Department for …

Permaculture Poised to Conquer the Caribbean – Independent European Daily Express

Permaculture Poised to Conquer the Caribbean
Independent European Daily Express
Joining him is a fluid group of permaculturalists working from their home islands and sharing the same goal: to harness permaculture as a solution to climate change, food and water insecurity, and rising costs of living. [pullquote]3[/pullquote]â

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Agroecology Movement Addresses Challenges of Food Security – Independent European Daily Express

Agroecology Movement Addresses Challenges of Food Security
Independent European Daily Express
Agriculture in this Caribbean island is going through its worst moment. Whereas this sector accounted for 71 percent of its gross domestic product in 1914, now it amounts to no more than one percent.Â. AÂ century ago, local agriculture employed over …

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Industrial Agriculture: Too Big to Succeed – Independent European Daily Express

Industrial Agriculture: Too Big to Succeed
Independent European Daily Express
The Canadian journalist travelled to southern France, China, India and the province of Quebec in her own country to observe how small farmers apply their practical knowledge of agriculture – defined as either organic, agroecological or sustainable.

Reproductive traits and conservation needs of the endemic gammarid Laurogammarus scutarensis (Schäferna, 1922) from the Skadar Lake system, Balkan Peninsula

Publication date: Available online 4 May 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Michał Grabowski , Karolina Bącela-Spychalska , Vladimir Pešić
Europe is one of the global hotspots of freshwater amphipod diversity with a number of endemic species yet many of European freshwater ecosystems are under extreme anthropogenic pressure. Studying the biology and ecology of endemic species may substantially help to assess risk of extinction and define proxies for their conservation. Laurogammarus scutarensis is a Balkan endemic and the only species within the genus Laurogammarus G. Karaman 1984. Its distribution is restricted to temperature-stable, cool waters of the springs, streams and lower sections of a few rivers emptying to the north-western part of the Skadar Lake in Montenegro–an area under heavy anthropogenic pressure in recent years. We examined life history of the species in a limnocrene spring with year-round stable temperature (10 °C ± 0.5) by estimating its population structure over a year, fecundity, reproductive period and relationship between photoperiod and reproduction. These parameters were compared to those of other gammarids, including invasive species, in order to estimate the role of photoperiod in shaping life history of L. scutarensis , and to give insight into the possible conservation needs for that species. Our results show that the species is univoltine and its reproduction continues round the year. However, its intensity is synchronised with seasonal day length changes with the highest share of females breeding in spring and early summer. The population sex structure is strongly female biased in most of the year. Number of eggs laid depends positively on the female body length; however the mean brood size (15.53 eggs) of L. scutarensis is rather low when compared to other species. Also partial fecundity and mean body length at which individuals start to reproduce indicate that its reproductive potential is much lower than that of many other gammarid species, including those colonizing many European water bodies in recent years. Concluding, the studied life history traits of L. scutarensis combined with its very narrow distribution range and peculiar thermal requirements reported in the literature provide as with the hint to define the species as vulnerable to threats posed by the habitat degradation and competition with other species. Taking into account the risk of invasion by alien species and progressive habitat loss, we are of the opinion that L. scutarensis should be recognised as an endangered species and that a conservation plan should be implement to prevent its possible extinction.

Implementing the Water Framework Directive in overseas Europe: a multimetric macroinvertebrate index for river bioassessment in Caribbean islands

Publication date: Available online 4 May 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Heliott Touron-Poncet , Caroline Bernadet , Arthur Compin , Nicolas Bargier , Régis Céréghino
Neotropical overseas regions of Europe have the same water policy objectives as the continental ones, but were overlooked during recent developments of bioassessment tools that fulfill the Water Framework Directive guidelines. We designed a macroinvertebrate-based multimetric index (IBMA) to assess ecological health in rivers of Martinique and Guadeloupe, two densely populated islands in the Lesser Antilles (Caribbean Sea). Invertebrates were sampled at 114 sites including reference and impacted river reaches following a normalized protocol. Among the 411 biological metrics calculated from our site-specific data, we selected metrics exhibiting the best trade-off between high discrimination efficiency, low specificity, low redundancy, and high stability under reference conditions. We finally retained seven metrics related to taxonomic diversity, species abundance, and preferences for some substratum types. Each metric was weighted by its discrimination efficiency. Using test data sets, we found that the IBMA was sensitive to the full range of disturbances in the area. Also, our index improved the detection of impairments, compared to the former practice by regional administrations. Finally, we suggest that the IBMA might prove relevant to neighboring islands in the biogeographic area.

To curb Indonesian deforestation, public pressure required, research suggests – Thomson Reuters Foundation

To curb Indonesian deforestation, public pressure required, research suggests
Thomson Reuters Foundation
… CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and was supported by NORAD, AusAID, DFID, the European Commission, the Department for International Development Cooperation of Finland, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

Global study: REDD+ initiatives see challenges — and opportunities – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Global study: REDD+ initiatives see challenges — and opportunities
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
This research was carried out as part of the Global Comparative Study on REDD+ and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and was supported in part by NORAD, AusAID, DFID, the European Commission, the Department for …

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Wild Fermenter Sandor Katz Coming to Europe – Permaculture Magazine


Permaculture Magazine

Wild Fermenter Sandor Katz Coming to Europe
Permaculture Magazine
Read more about Sandor Katz in the summer Issue of Permaculture magazine. Published end of April 2014. Wild Fermentation: How to make sauerkraut, kimchi and preserve other vegetables · Review – The Art of Fermentation: An in-depth exploration of …

Cranfield University to coordinate agroforestry project – Horticulture Week

Cranfield University to coordinate agroforestry project
Horticulture Week
Cranfield University in Bedfordshire will coordinate a "EUR4m-EUR6m" European project to investigate how agroforestry can benefit farming, both economically and environmentally. A 26-strong group of European and international institutions will be 

Dietary supply with essential lipids affects growth and survival of the amphipod Gammarus roeselii

Publication date: March 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters, Volume 46
Author(s): René Gergs , Nicole Steinberger , Timo Basen , Dominik Martin-Creuzburg
Growth and survival of benthic macroinvertebrates depend on the availability and the quality of potential food sources. The significance of essential biochemical nutrients, such as sterols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), for benthic invertebrates has been insufficiently studied. We investigated the effects of these essential lipids on growth and survival of the benthic gammarid Gammarus roeselii , a widespread species in streams, rivers and lentic waters of Central Europe, in standardized feeding experiments. Juvenile gammarids were fed a mixture of three cyanobacteria with no evidence of toxin production, either unsupplemented or supplemented with cholesterol or the long-chain PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) using bovine serum albumin (BSA) to load algal or cyanobacterial cells with single lipid, and a mixture of three eukaryotic algae containing various sterols and long-chain PUFAs. Our results revealed that growth and especially survival of gammarids on the cyanobacterial diet significantly increased upon supplementation with cholesterol and DHA, indicating that the nutritional inadequacy of cyanobacteria for gammarids and potentially other benthic invertebrates is at least partially due to a deficiency in these essential lipids. We propose that the expected increase in the frequency of pelagic cyanobacterial mass developments as a consequence of global warming will also affect benthic food web processes to an as-yet-unknown magnitude.

Fecundity of the mayfly Ephoron virgo (Olivier, 1791) (Ephemeroptera: Polymitarcyidae): A long-term study in the River Rhine

Publication date: Available online 23 February 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Armin Kureck , Rosita Bieg , Rosalinde Wendeler , Jost Borcherding
The fecundity of the mayfly Ephoron virgo in the River Rhine was studied over a period of twelve years (1992-2003) and compared in four European rivers in 1998. The field data were complemented by mass-rearing in flumes with fresh running river water (1999-2001). The dry mass of a single egg averaged to 4.15 ± 0.25 μg, without any significant spatial or temporal differences. Total egg mass per female was found as a reliable measurement of fecundity in E. virgo that significantly increased with increasing weight of a female. Within a sample, individual females differed tremendously in egg numbers. This high variability even remained under more homogenous conditions in a densely populated experimental flume. In 1998, fecundity of E. virgo in the Rhine tributaries Main and Neckar was significantly lower than in the rivers Rhine and Lahn, averaging between about 2500 and 4100 eggs per female, respectively. Fecundity did not differ throughout the flight period at the Rhine. Though differences in fecundity between 1992 and 2003 were observed in the Rhine, no clear temporal tendency could be detected. Under extremely high population densities of E. virgo in experimental flumes, fecundity was slightly lower compared to parallel field samples. Based on these fecundity data, the decline of the population of E. virgo in the Lower Rhine is discussed with respect to some potential environmental factors, giving clear hints that it is not a simple effect of food limitation.

India can do well in Biotechnology: Marc Van Montagu – Zee News

India can do well in Biotechnology: Marc Van Montagu
Zee News
It would be wrong to believe that scientists are not concerned about agro-ecology and biodiversity," Montagu said. Citing the example of Golden Rice, he said that non-adoption of this product so far manifests 'Europe's delusion'. After a decade of
India can do well in Biotechnology: Marc Van Montagu | Business Standard Business Standard



all 2 news articles »

Dietary supply with essential lipids affects growth and survival of the amphipod Gammarusroeselii

Publication date: Available online 5 February 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): René Gergs , Nicole Steinberger , Timo Basen , Dominik Martin-Creuzburg
Growth and survival of benthic macroinvertebratesdepend on theavailabilityand the quality of potential food sources. The significance of essential biochemical nutrients, such as sterols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), for benthic invertebrates has been insufficiently studied. We investigated the effects of these essential lipids on growth and survival of the benthic gammarid Gammarusroeselii , a widespread species in streams, rivers and lentic waters of Central Europe,in standardized feeding experiments.Juvenile gammaridswere fed a mixture of three cyanobacteria with no evidence of toxin production, either unsupplemented or supplemented with cholesterol or the long-chain PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA)to load algal or cyanobacterial cells with single lipid, and a mixture of three eukaryotic algaecontainingvarious sterols and long-chain PUFAs.Our results revealed that growth and especially survival of gammarids on the cyanobacterial diet significantly increased upon supplementation with cholesterol and DHA, indicating that the nutritional inadequacy of cyanobacteria for gammarids and potentially other benthic invertebrates is at least partially due to a deficiency in these essential lipids. We propose that the expected increase in the frequency of pelagic cyanobacterial mass developments as a consequence of global warming will also affect benthic food web processesto anas yet unknown magnitude.

Double A Displays Made in Europe Paper at Paperworld Frankfurt 2014 – ACN Newswire (press release)

Double A Displays Made in Europe Paper at Paperworld Frankfurt 2014
ACN Newswire (press release)
This unique agro-forestry guarantees the biodiversity of the land and provides local farmers with additional income. The high fiber pulp from KHAN-NA delivers the premium quality trusted by consumers in more than 120 countries. Paperworld visitors are 

No differences between littoral fish community structure of small natural and gravel pit lakes in the northern German lowlands

Publication date: Available online 10 January 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Matthias Emmrich , Svenja Schälicke , Daniel Hühn , Christian Lewin , Robert Arlinghaus
Habitat loss has been identified as a major contributor to declining freshwater biodiversity, resulting in a high thread level among European fishes. Non-natural ecosystems such as pit lakes may compensate habitat loss by providing new habitat for aquatic organisms. We compared the structure of the littoral fish communities of 18 natural and 19 gravel pit lakes located in the northern German lowlands to evaluate whether artificial lakes managed by angling clubs host similar communities as typically observed in natural lakes. The fish community structure was analyzed between the lake types and along gradients of lake morphometry, productivity and littoral complexity. Although the gravel pit lakes differed in morphology (characterized by steeper littoral slopes and less structured littoral habitat), differences in fish community structure between the natural and gravel pit lakes were weak and mainly related to differences in the abundance of the dominant species perch, roach and rudd. Both lake types had similar species richness, community diversity and hosted several small-bodied and endangered species. To conclude, fish communities characteristic of small natural lakes may serve as reference for the development of gravel pit lakes. Moreover, our study reveals that recreational-fisheries management of gravel pit lakes does not result in artificial communities that deviate strongly from the communities present in natural lakes. Therefore, nature conservation and fisheries management goals can be reconciled in relation to fish in small artificial lakes managed by angling clubs.

Women Farmers in Chile to Teach the Region Agroecology – Independent European Daily Express

Women Farmers in Chile to Teach the Region Agroecology
Independent European Daily Express
SANTIAGO, Jan 04 (IPS) – An organisation that brings together some 10,000 peasant and indigenous women from Chile is launching an agroecology institute for women campesinos, or small farmers, in South America. For years, the National Association of 

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Fish assemblages in forest drainage ditches: degraded small streams or novel habitats?

Publication date: Available online 30 December 2013
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Raul Rosenvald , Rein Järvekülg , Asko Lõhmus
Artificial drainage of forested wetlands to increase timber production has profoundly altered the hydrology of North-European landscapes during the 20th century. Nowadays, drainage ditches and small dredged streams can comprise most fluvial water bodies there, but the resulting ecological effects are poorly documented. In the current study, we explored, using fish as an indicator group, consequences of the transformation of natural stream networks to a mixture of natural and artificial watercourses. We asked whether the transformation results in impoverishment, enrichment or re-assembling of the communities both at watercourse and the landscape scales. We sampled fish in 98 sites in five well-forested regions in Estonia where ditches formed 83–92%, dredged streams 4–7%, and natural streams 3–10% of the total length of small watercourses. Based on a total of 6370 individual fish of 20 species, we found that, compared to natural streams, ditches had an impoverished fauna at both scales and both in terms of species richness and assemblage composition. Only natural streams hosted characteristic species (with Barbatula barbatula , Lampetra planeri and Lota lota emerging as significant indicators), while dredged streams had intermediate assemblages. The habitat factors explaining those drainage-related differences included a reduced flow velocity, loss of stream channel variability, less transparent water, and abundant aquatic vegetation. Hence, for stream-dwelling fish, drained forest landscapes represent degraded habitats rather than novel ecosystems, which contrasts with the transformation of terrestrial assemblages. Future studies should address whether that reflects the situation for whole aquatic assemblages, and how is the functioning of the hydrological systems affected. We suggest that the critical management issues for environmental mitigation of ditching effects on fish include basin scale spatial planning, protecting of the remaining natural streams, and rehabilitation of ditch channels in flat landscapes lacking beavers.

Every Eucalyptus Felled Equals Gallons of Water – Independent European Daily Express

Every Eucalyptus Felled Equals Gallons of Water
Independent European Daily Express
Her husband, Amos Ndze, tells IPS that agro-forestry practices are much more rewarding. "My wife is getting larger yields from the farm than was the case when I planted eucalyptus trees here, and these medicinal plants and fruit trees are giving me

Farmers in Mozambique Fear Brazilian-Style Agriculture – Independent European Daily Express

Farmers in Mozambique Fear Brazilian-Style Agriculture
Independent European Daily Express
The signatories demanded the immediate suspension of the programme, an official dialogue with all affected segments of society, a priority on family farming and agroecology, and a policy based on food sovereignty. They also said that all of the

Population traits of invasive bleak Alburnus alburnus between different habitats in Iberian fresh waters

Publication date: Available online 24 December 2013
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): David Almeida , Paris V. Stefanoudis , David H. Fletcher , Carlos Rangel , Eduardo da Silva
The bleak Alburnus alburnus (L.) is a cyprinid native to most of Europe, mainly inhabiting lentic environments. This fish species is a successful invader in the Iberian Peninsula, where it was first introduced to reservoirs as forage fish during the 1990s. Bleaks threaten the highly endemic Iberian fish fauna by means of trophic competition and hybridization. Yet, little is known about the environmental biology of bleaks in the Iberian Peninsula, particularly far from impounded waters. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare seasonal and gender variation of size structure, body condition and reproductive investment of bleaks between different habitats. Only sexually mature bleaks were seasonally collected and examined from the River Gévora and the Sierra Brava Reservoir (southwestern Spain) to assess more in-depth the adaptive capacity at the population level and the subsequent invasiveness. Bleak was an abundant species in the fish assemblages of both habitat types (i.e. river and reservoir). The proportion of smaller mature bleaks was lower in the river than the reservoir during spring and the opposite pattern was observed during winter. Both male and females were larger in the river during the breeding season in the study areas (i.e. spring), as well as with higher body condition and reproductive investment. These findings suggest that bleaks enhance their reproduction rate in the river to compensate for higher mortality in this habitat, where environmental conditions may be harsher due to the winter floods and summer droughts typical of Mediterranean water courses. Overall results highlight the high degree of plasticity in population traits of the bleak in the Iberian Peninsula, which will surely aid its ability to adapt to a wide variety of Mediterranean ecosystems, including lentic and lotic environments. Consequently, this invasive fish may pose a serious risk for the highly valuable fauna of Mediterranean Europe.

Response of fish and benthic invertebrate communities to constrained channel conditions in a mountain river: Case study of the Biała, Polish Carpathians

Publication date: Available online 21 December 2013
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Bartłomiej Wyżga , Antoni Amirowicz , Paweł Oglęcki , Hanna Hajdukiewicz , Artur Radecki-Pawlik , Joanna Zawiejska , Paweł Mikuś
Following considerable hydromorphological degradation in past decades, the gravel-bed Biała River, Polish Carpathians, is to be restored through establishing erodible corridor in two river sections. In these sections, relatively long, unmanaged channel reaches alternate with short, channelized reaches located in the vicinity of bridges. Effects of the alternating morphologies on physical habitat conditions, fish and benthic invertebrate communities, and ecological river quality were investigated in 10 pairs of unmanaged and channelized cross-sections located between significant tributaries. Unmanaged cross-sections with an average of two low-flow channels exhibited significantly greater variation in depth-averaged and near-bed velocity and bed material size than single-thread, channelized cross-sections. Summer, autumn and winter surveys of benthic invertebrates indicated that the unmanaged cross-sections typically hosted three times more taxa than channelized cross-sections, and this was reflected in distinct appraisal of the two cross-section types by means of invertebrate-based BMWP-PL index. Electrofishing indicated no statistically significant difference in the number of fish species between both types of river cross-sections, and the resultant similar scores of the European Fish Index allowed both cross-section types to be associated with the same class of ecological river quality. This study indicated that short channelized river reaches do not disrupt continuity of fish populations, although they provide worse habitats for fish, reflected in the lower numbers of individuals, especially juveniles. It also highlighted the need of investigating various groups of river biota to determine the response of river biocoenosis to environmental stressors and evaluate the ecological status of the river.

Corn pest decline may save farmers money

Populations of European corn borer (ECB), a major corn crop pest, have declined significantly in the eastern United States, according to Penn State researchers. The decline suggests that the use of genetically modified, ECB-resistant corn hybrids — an expensive, yet effective, solution that has been widely adopted by farmers — may now be unnecessary in some areas.

Diet of two invading gobiid species (Proterorhinus semilunaris and Neogobius melanostomus) during the breeding and hatching season: no field evidence of extensive predation on fish eggs and fry

Publication date: Available online 16 December 2013
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Mojmír Vašek , Lucie Všetičková , Kevin Roche , Pavel Jurajda
One of the potential impacts of invasive gobies on native fish fauna is predation on eggs and fry. Therefore, the diet composition of two invading gobiid species, the tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris and round goby Neogobius melanostomus, was examined in the Dyje river system (Danube basin, Central Europe) during the 2011 reproductive season to ascertain the extent of gobiid predation on heterospecific and conspecific eggs and juveniles. Consumption of fish eggs and juveniles by invading gobies was very low. The diets of both species consisted largely of benthic macroinvertebrates, and particularly insect larvae. These results indicate that invading gobies in the Dyje river system are likely to impact native fish fauna more through competitive effects than through direct predation on eggs and juveniles.

EU sparks brouhaha over endocrine disruptors

For quite some time, European policymakers have been working on a plan to regulate endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In the last few months, the process has sparked a furor among researchers and public health experts, with a heated battle of editorials raging in scientific journals that highlights clear conflicts of interest among those critiquing European action.

EDCs are compounds that alter the hormonal systems in an organism, and many of these chemicals are in widespread use. If the European Union (EU) regulates EDCs, it will be the first policy in the world that addresses the endocrine disruptor problem.

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Africa Urged to Use Multilateral Approach to Achieve Sustainable Development – Independent European Daily Express

Africa Urged to Use Multilateral Approach to Achieve Sustainable Development
Independent European Daily Express
In a side event at the COP19, Henry Neufeldt, head of climate change research at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) said that the global food system emits between 9.5 and 14.7 gigatonnes of carbon into the atmosphere every year. This amounts to 

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Above the fold: EPA, protect bees!

Inaction? Intransigence? Negligence? Whatever the right word, we’re reminded that the U.S. is behind the curve when it comes to protecting bees. Yesterday, Europe’s restrictions on bee-harming pesticides went into effect.

Today, in a full-page advertisement in the New York Times and six other major papers, PAN and over 60 food, farm, faith and investor groups are calling on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to take action. Quickly.

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The MST come to town | World Development Movement – World Development Movement (press release)

The MST come to town | World Development Movement
World Development Movement (press release)
Added to this the movement also runs a national agroecology school where peasants from across the Brazil and even the world can come to learn about alternative agricultural methods, as well politics. Isis and Ana had come over to Europe on a mission to 

After 12-Year Limbo, New GM Maize May Hit Europe’s Fields – Science AAAS

After 12-Year Limbo, New GM Maize May Hit Europe's Fields
Science AAAS
Instead of trying to build coherent E.U.-wide rules, the commission “is shying away now that the going gets tough,” says Angelika Hilbeck, an agroecology researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. At the moment, only two GM

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Implementing ecological potential of lakes for the Water Framework Directive–Approach in Flanders (northern Belgium)

Publication date: Available online 24 October 2013
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Luc Denys , Jeroen Van Wichelen , Jo Packet , Gerald Louette
The European Water Framework Directive stipulates that artificial and heavily modified water bodies must reach good ecological potential, as opposed to good ecological status as required for natural water bodies, if certain hydrological and morphological pressures cannot be removed. We propose to obtain these objectives from the conditions expected once all feasible mitigating measures have been taken but relative to the internationally agreed quality goals for natural lakes. This allows a more objective, consistent and transparent definition of the possible deviation from the ultimate quality level than prevalent methods, in particular those considering the improvement expected from future measures. A level of functional integrity should be endeavored that minimizes the probability of undesired phenomena and negative consequences for biodiversity objectives embodied by the Habitats Directive. This remains a difficult exercise, but as a first approximation, constraints for the secondary alteration of lake hydrochemistry and the consequent potential for development of submerged vegetation can be considered. Six case studies illustrate possible procedures, which may be further refined to include additional relations between hydromorphological pressures, physical-chemical conditions and biota as knowledge develops or circumstances require.

Bulgaria to Receive EUR 2.338 B from European Agricultural Fund for Rural … – Novinite.com


Novinite.com

Bulgaria to Receive EUR 2.338 B from European Agricultural Fund for Rural
Novinite.com
However, the participants in Tuesday's meeting rejected the proposal by the EP to reduce the percentage of co-financing from the EAFRD for agroecology, organic farming and Natura 2000, from 75% to 55%. Bulgaria's request to expand the list of tied aid

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Anderson highlights the role of AFBI in Europe – Farming Life


Farming Life

Anderson highlights the role of AFBI in Europe
Farming Life
Research work at AFBI has resulted in securing funding from the R&D FP7 programme for solutions to the emerging disease threats from Trichoderma and Virus X in the mushroom industry and for Agroforestry systems. These are complex systems but provide 

Europe, Africa Study Roads to Sustainable Intensification – ThePoultrySite.com

Europe, Africa Study Roads to Sustainable Intensification
ThePoultrySite.com
Sustainable intensification, ecology, agro-ecology, doubly green revolution, etc, etc… there is no shortage of words to express the need to innovate to ensure the future of agriculture worldwide, particularly in Africa. While the multiplication of

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Syngenta takes aim at EU’s neonic ban

Last week, Syngenta filed a legal challenge against the European Union's decision to suspend use of its pesticide, thiamethoxam. At the heart of the challenge? Syngenta says their product is wrongly accused of contributing to bee declines.

But the independent science detailing harm to bees from this and other pesticides is clear. And earlier this year, after reviewing the evidence for themselves, European policymakers determined that three widely used neonicotinoids — including thiamethoxam — pose a "high acute risk" to honey bees. Still, the pesticide corporation is protesting. Vehemently.

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FAO Infosylva Reports on Progress with FLEGT and VPA Processes – IISD Reporting Services

FAO Infosylva Reports on Progress with FLEGT and VPA Processes
IISD Reporting Services
On upcoming events, the newsletter reports on the International Boreal Forest Research Association, celebrations of the 20th Anniversary of the European Forest Institute (EFI), the World Congress on Agroforestry 2014, and the second European Forest Week.

Age matters—Experienced predation risk affects behavior and morphology of juvenile 0+ and 1+ perch

Publication date: January 2014
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters, Volume 44
Author(s): M. Heynen , I. Rentrop , J. Borcherding
Empirical field studies have shown relations between predation risk and differences in anti-predator behavior and morphology between and within perch populations. The present study used juvenile 0+ and 1+ perch in an experimental approach to vary the factor predation risk. Predators were able to feed on perch during the experimental period in large outdoor tanks. Perceived predation risk affected the behavior and the morphology of both age classes of perch, with perch being deeper bodied and shyer with increasing intensity of predation. Changes in morphology were somewhat more pronounced in the 0+ age group, while the 1+ age group exhibited significantly stronger changes in behavior, but behaved less conform within groups. Though it remains unanswered if the predator induced these changes by selective predation, or if perch adjusted their behavior and morphology in response to the predator, the results indicate that perceived predation risk can have a fast and strong direct effect on amount and distribution of phenotypes within a prey population. The results further suggest that balance and use of anti-predator strategies on different response levels may be differential over age-classes in European perch.

Haitian Farmers Lauded for Food Sovereignty Work – Independent European Daily Express

Haitian Farmers Lauded for Food Sovereignty Work
Independent European Daily Express
WASHINGTON, Aug 14 (IPS) – Work by the Group of 4 (G4) union of Haitian peasant organisations, along with assistance from the Dessalines Brigade – South American peasant leaders and agroecology experts supported by La Via Campesina – has been 

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Free trade pacts target illegal timber exports – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)


Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Free trade pacts target illegal timber exports
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
discussed in this article, please contact Pablo Pacheco at p.pacheco@cgiar.org. This work forms part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and is supported by the European Union in the context of the PROFORMAL Project.

In Kenya, Small Is Vulnerable – Independent European Daily Express

In Kenya, Small Is Vulnerable
Independent European Daily Express
An approach that brings together strategies of farming that do not use chemicals,” Gathuru Mburu, coordinator of the African Biodiversity Network tells IPS. “Farmers are producing inadequately due to overuse of chemicals. Agro-ecology uses animal manure.

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Information flow is vital for ecosystem-based adaptation – expert – Reuters AlertNet

Information flow is vital for ecosystem-based adaptation – expert
Reuters AlertNet
This research was carried out as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and the Tropical Forests and Climate Change Adaptation (TroFCCA) research program, conducted by CATIE and CIFOR and funded by the European 

Information flow is vital for ecosystem – based adaptation – . . . – Reuters AlertNet

Information flow is vital for ecosystem – based adaptation – . . .
Reuters AlertNet
This research was carried out as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and the Tropical Forests and Climate Change Adaptation (TroFCCA) research program, conducted by CATIE and CIFOR and funded by the European 

Information flow is vital for ecosystem-based adaptation – expert – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)


Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Information flow is vital for ecosystem-based adaptation – expert
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
This research was carried out as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry and the Tropical Forests and Climate Change Adaptation”(TroFCCA) research program, conducted by CATIE and CIFOR and funded by the European 

Living Laboratory for Coping with Drought in Brazil – Independent European Daily Express

Living Laboratory for Coping with Drought in Brazil
Independent European Daily Express
Another surprise is the breadth of knowledge Manto displays; he calls himself a "family farmer in transition toward agroecology." At the age of 40 he has become well-known for his inventive solutions for coping with the periodic droughts of Brazil's

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North American Agroforestry Conference held in Charlottetown – Atlantic Farm Focus


Atlantic Farm Focus

North American Agroforestry Conference held in Charlottetown
Atlantic Farm Focus
Close to 100 scientists, land managers and producers, some from as far away as Europe, attended the 13th North American Agroforestry Conference June 19-21, 2013 on Prince Edward Island. Topics : Association for Temperate Agroforestry , North American 

North American Agroforestry Conference held in Charlottetown – Farm Focus


Farm Focus

North American Agroforestry Conference held in Charlottetown
Farm Focus
Close to 100 scientists, land managers and producers, some from as far away as Europe, attended the 13th North American Agroforestry Conference June 19-21, 2013 on Prince Edward Island. Topics : Association for Temperate Agroforestry , North American 

Pressure-specific and multiple pressure response of fish assemblages in European running waters

Publication date: Available online 3 July 2013
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): Rafaela Schinegger , Clemens Trautwein , Stefan Schmutz
We classified homogenous river types across Europe and searched for fish metrics qualified to show responses to specific pressures (hydromorphological pressures or water quality pressures) vs. multiple pressures in these river types. We analysed fish taxa lists from 3105 sites in 16 ecoregions and 14 countries. Sites were pre-classified for 15 selected pressures to separate unimpacted from impacted sites. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to split unimpacted sites into four homogenous river types based on species composition and geographical location. Classification trees were employed to predict associated river types for impacted sites with four environmental variables. We defined a set of 129 candidate fish metrics to select the best reacting metrics for each river type. The candidate metrics represented tolerances/intolerances of species associated with six metric types: habitat, migration, water quality sensitivity, reproduction, trophic level and biodiversity. The results showed that 17 uncorrelated metrics reacted to pressures in the four river types. Metrics responded specifically to water quality pressures and hydromorphological pressures in three river types and to multiple pressures in all river types. Four metrics associated with water quality sensitivity showed a significant reaction in up to three river types, whereas 13 metrics were specific to individual river types. Our results contribute to the better understanding of fish assemblage response to human pressures at a pan-European scale. The results are especially important for European river management and restoration, as it is necessary to uncover underlying processes and effects of human pressures on aquatic communities.

Feeding the World in Harmony with Nature – Independent European Daily Express

Feeding the World in Harmony with Nature
Independent European Daily Express
A holistic study of agroecosystems focusing on environmental and human interrelationships, agroecology has been practised since the advent of agriculture thousands of years ago, and could offer answers to the challenge of producing food safely and 

EU Seed Law Update & Why Grow Heritage Seeds | Permaculture Magazine – Permaculture Magazine


Permaculture Magazine

EU Seed Law Update & Why Grow Heritage Seeds | Permaculture Magazine
Permaculture Magazine
Many of you will have heard about the updated seed law just passed by the European Union. Due to intensive lobbying by people like us it's a bit less bad than it could have been but its main thrust is still to favour the big multi-national seed

EU flags another bee-harming pesticide

Regulators across the pond are keeping up the momentum to protect the pollinators, with a new report from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) adding fipronil to the list of pesticides that pose a threat to honey bees.

EFSA made similar declarations about three other bee-harming insecticides earlier this year, and the EU responded with a two-year ban on the use of those chemicals. We have yet to see if fipronil will be added to the list of restricted pesticides, but EFSA's conclusion signals that protections for bees are more likely.

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Europe steps up for bees. EPA, your turn!

In a historic vote on Monday, the European Union (EU) passed a continent-wide restriction on the use of bee-harming pesticides. Despite immense pressure from the pesticide industry, a majority of EU countries sided with bees.

Here in the U.S., policymakers have yet to step up. And with beekeepers in this country reporting record-breaking bee losses this year — up to 40% or more — action to protect honey bees is more urgent than ever.

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In Haiti, April Showers Don’t Always Bring Flowers – Independent European Daily Express

In Haiti, April Showers Don't Always Bring Flowers
Independent European Daily Express
He said the biggest efforts should focus on producing more, starting with areas where there is “a certain level of competitiveness,” such as cassava and sweet potatoes, to later integrate production in an agroforestry system that preserves the environment.