Farmers Can Achieve High Yields While Lowering Environmental Footprint – Care2.com


Care2.com

Farmers Can Achieve High Yields While Lowering Environmental Footprint
Care2.com
The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), funded by CGIAR, is headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya. By generating scientific research on the diverse functions of trees in agriculture, ICRAF intends to improve food security, farmer incomes, and social cohesion …

How Growing Trees On the Farm Leads to Food Security – AllAfrica.com

How Growing Trees On the Farm Leads to Food Security
AllAfrica.com
In providing an overview of the link between trees and food security for smallholder farmers, Dr Catherine Muthuri from World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), explains that in a similar project conducted in Burundi, Rwanda and Ethiopia, sensitising the

Farmers Can Achieve High Yields While Lowering Environmental Footprint – Food Tank (blog)

Farmers Can Achieve High Yields While Lowering Environmental Footprint
Food Tank (blog)
The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), funded by CGIAR, is headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya. By generating scientific research on the diverse functions of trees in agriculture, ICRAF intends to improve food security, farmer incomes, and social cohesion …

Bicol reporters take up newsroom workshop on climate change – Vox Bikol

Bicol reporters take up newsroom workshop on climate change
Vox Bikol
The event was supported by Department of Agriculture, Metro Pacific Investments Corp., Smart Communications, Philex Mining Corp., CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security in Southeast Asia, World Agroforestry Center …

and more »

Soil Security and Incorporating Forestry Into Food Security Strategies – New Security Beat (blog)

Soil Security and Incorporating Forestry Into Food Security Strategies
New Security Beat (blog)
The authors explain how agroforestry techniques can be both restorative and productive for ecosystems. “Working with farmers to combine the best of traditional and formal scientific knowledge offers tremendous potential to enhance the productivity and …

Soil Security and Incorporating Forestry Into Food Security Strategies | New … – New Security Beat (blog)

Soil Security and Incorporating Forestry Into Food Security Strategies | New
New Security Beat (blog)
The authors explain how agroforestry techniques can be both restorative and productive for ecosystems. “Working with farmers to combine the best of traditional and formal scientific knowledge offers tremendous potential to enhance the productivity and …

Notes from the Field: Ixhuatlan del Café, Veracruz, Mexico

In early June, CAN Executive Director Rose Cohen and Associate Director Heather Putnam traveled to the Central Highlands of Veracruz, Mexico to meet with CAN network partners there and visit rural coffee-growing communities where CAN is working to promote food security and sovereignty in addition to women’s and youth economic empowerment. Heather filed this report:

Our visit included participating in a workshop with families working with CAN and VIDA’s food security and sovereignty project. Women and youth collectively reflected on what they had achieved in the last four years of the project and what they saw that still needs to be improved to further decrease seasonal hunger and strengthen livelihoods in their communities. The women shared their accomplishments, which include having more food available because of their vegetable gardens and all of the agroecological practices, like composting, that they had learned through the project. As one woman put it, “with all of the different food available, if there are no beans, then we can go get some squash or something else out of the garden and change our diet according to what is in the garden, and we eat well. Or we could trade foods that we have for foods that we don’t.”

However, the women pointed out that with the continuing crisis of the coffee leaf rust affecting their coffee yields even more this year than last, that things had been difficult in the last year and would probably be more challenging in the year to come. One woman said, “this year we will have to look for another way to earn money. I am going to take in sewing. That is what we have to do—be creative.” They also said that the situation will be difficult for a few years to come as they are replanting the affected coffee plants this year, but it will take at least three more years to have a coffee harvest from these plants.

The next day we were able to meet with AgroEco® coffee farmers from the Campesinos en la Lucha Agraria Cooperative and sign this year’s coffee importing contract based on the price and terms we had negotiated with them. They told us how they had invested the Women’s Unpaid Labor Fund from last year’s coffee harvest into the development of a women-centered agroecological coffee brand called Femcafe, which they will market locally in Mexico.

Finally we were able to visit the CAN-supported school garden in the high school in the community of Ocotitlan. There we met the graduating class of seniors who had built the school garden in its new location on land donated by a local farmer. The students showed us the amazing diversity of plants in the garden and shared the skills they had learned, like production planning, double-digging, making compost, and companion planting.

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist – Frederick News Post (subscription)

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist
Frederick News Post (subscription)
Michael Judd has worked with agro-ecological and whole system designs throughout the Americas for the last 20 years focusing on applying permaculture and ecological design to increase local food security and community health in both tropical and …

To improve food security, look to the forests, new report says – Mongabay.com


Mongabay.com

To improve food security, look to the forests, new report says
Mongabay.com
But forests and tree-based farming systems such as agroforestry can complement agricultural production to ensure greater food security and better nutrition for some of the world's most vulnerable communities, Stepha McMullin, a social scientist with

and more »

Report from the Field | Quintana Roo

CAN Associate Director Heather Putnam recently visited the Zona Maya in Quintana Roo, Mexico to meet with women’s groups working with CAN and the Intercultural Maya University of Quintana Roo (UIMQRoo) to improve household food security and sovereignty in a two year project funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Here is her report from the field.

I traveled with Robin Pacheco, a project field technician, and three UIMQRoo students working in the field, to four of the six rural communities we are working with in the Zona Maya. The goal of the collaborative project between CAN and UIMQRoo is to improve household food security and nutrition by promoting increased production diversity (more vegetables and protein sources) and income diversification.  The project team on the ground make up of professors, field technicians, and students works directly with small groups of indigenous Maya women in the communities to strengthen traditional and agroecological food production practices, establish direct market channels between the women’s groups and local and regional venues like restaurants and markets, and also to ensure the long-term sustainability of the women’s groups themselves to operate these enterprises.

Our first stop was the community of Kancabchen, a community that was recently integrated into the project in October 2014. The eight women there established their vegetable gardens in October, and have now expanded their home production from yams, beans, and tomatoes to include habanero chile, green chiles, Maya squash, cilantro, radishes, and cucumbers. They told me that they were happy to have these products available right behind their houses for their families’ tables. Lidia Moo Poot, the president of the women’s organization, told me “Now we can have confidence in what we eat and what it contains. Our children will grow up healthier.”

The women were were excited to have participated for the first time the previous Saturday in the monthly tianguis, or farmers market, organized by UIMQRoo in José Mariá Morelos , where they enjoyed telling consumers there about their agroecologically grown produce. The women are looking forward to getting more training in the production of organic fertilizers, and to completing the fences around their gardens to keep animals out. One challenge that is worrisome is the unseasonal drought that is affecting production; the rains should have arrived in the middle of March, but as of the end of April still had not. We talked about the need to install water catchment systems to ensure that families could continue to produce diverse nutritious foods throughout the year, even as climate change brings more seasonal drought.

I also visited the communities of Candelaria, Bulukax, and Tabasco and spoke with the women’s groups there. The women in Candelaria are expanding their chicken and egg production through the project and are anticipating have enough hens producing enough eggs to bring to market in about six months. In the meantime they will be working with the team at UIMQRoo to establish relationships with buyers who will value the organic production and healthiness of their eggs.  In Bulukax and Tabasco my conversations with the women’s groups were dominated by their worries about water — they are affected not only by the drought, but by salty groundwater or chlorinated municipal water, both unfit for irrigation.  These conversations only reinforced by understanding of the urgency of focusing on ways to improve water access; any changes we hope to make in increasing the availability of healthy and nutritious foods year round will depend on water.

Presentation at SCAA Meeting in Seattle, Washington

Community Agroecology Network’s (CAN) Food Security & Sovereignty in Las Segovias, Nicaragua project was selected as a finalist for the 2015 Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) Sustainability Award. Roseann Cohen, executive director of CAN, Maria Eugenia Flores, project manager, Christopher Bacon, CAN affiliated researcher and assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences at Santa Clara University; and Merling Preza, general manager of PRODECOOP traveled to Seattle for the awards presentation at the SCAA 2015 annual meeting. While there, Maria Eugenia also presented the project at the Innovations in Sustainability Panel.

CAN’s project contributes to the long-term sustainability of the coffee industry in three ways. First, it promotes food sovereignty in coffee growing communities, which means healthy and stable families and communities who are able to stay on their land and make a livelihood from coffee and food production, and benefit from improved nutrition. This in turn makes the coffee supply stable. Second, this project supports improved coffee quality and long-term ecological sustainability of coffee production by promoting improved soil fertility and improved coffee shade management practices that also result in increased availability of diverse foods at the farm level. Finally, the project promotes stronger farmer cooperative organizations and their capacity to enhance the well-being of their members.

Project Details

The Food Security and Sovereignty Project in Las Segovias, Nicaragua is a collective initiative funded over the last 5 1/2 years by Keurig Green Mountain and implemented through a long-time partnership model integrating participatory action research and agroecology with cooperatives between CAN, PRODECOOP. R. L, a second level coffee cooperative, CIIASDENIC, a local nonprofit organization, and Nicaraguan and U.S. based universities. It aims to reduce and eventually eliminate seasonal hunger with 1,500 family farmers in 18 smallholder cooperatives. Core strategies includes sustainable solutions managed and owned by the cooperative to re-localize control over the local food system and reduce vulnerability to climate shocks.

Click here to learn more.

Who Granted The “GMO Evangelists” The Monopoly On Compassion? – Center for Research on Globalization


Center for Research on Globalization

Who Granted The “GMO Evangelists” The Monopoly On Compassion?
Center for Research on Globalization
Indeed, agroecology is at the centre of a struggle for sustainability, land, food security and self-determination. It's not a fad. It has fed the world for centuries. However, industrialised global agriculture has taken control of food and land and has

and more »

Who Granted The GMO Evangelists The Monopoly On Compassion? – RINF Alternative News


RINF Alternative News

Who Granted The GMO Evangelists The Monopoly On Compassion?
RINF Alternative News
Indeed, agroecology is at the centre of a struggle for sustainability, land, food security and self-determination. It's not a fad. It has fed the world for centuries. However, industrialised global agriculture has taken control of food and land and has

and more »

GMO debate outdated, argues food security lobbyist – Capital FM Kenya (press release) (subscription) (blog)


Capital FM Kenya (press release) (subscription) (blog)

GMO debate outdated, argues food security lobbyist
Capital FM Kenya (press release) (subscription) (blog)
NAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 21 – Agricultural campaign organisation Green Peace Africa has called on the government to move away from the Genetically Modified Foods debate and invest in ecological farming techniques. Green Peace Agriculture Campaigner …

Supporting Sustainable Urban Agriculture From the Ground Up – CSUF News


CSUF News

Supporting Sustainable Urban Agriculture From the Ground Up
CSUF News
This academic year, 20 students are investigating such issues as food security, childhood nutrition, food safety, waste diversion, agroecology and techniques of urban agriculture. Lorenzo Vinluan IV, and his classmates, called the Green Team, are

PARC introduces 11 new high-yielding rice varieties – Pakistan Observer

PARC introduces 11 new high-yielding rice varieties
Pakistan Observer
Saturday, April 18, 2015 – Islamabad—The Pakistan Agriculture Research Council (PARC) approved eleven new high-yielding rice varieties including seven (7) hybrid and four (4) Open-Pollinated (OP) seed for cultivation in various ecologies. The Variety …
Govt plans to prepare food security policy The Nation



all 3 news articles »

FAO stresses on ensuring food security and tackling climate change impact – fnbnews.com

FAO stresses on ensuring food security and tackling climate change impact
fnbnews.com
He suggested some measures ACP countries could take to build resilience and adapt food systems while coping with changing climate patterns. "Sustainable land and water management, and approaches such as climate-smart agriculture and agro-ecology …

and more »

Panel to discuss insects as a human food source

A panel of experts will discuss the use of edible insects to attain greater global food security, from noon to 1:30 p.m. April 21, in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library on the University Park campus of Penn State. “Creepy, Crawly, Crunchy: Can Insects Feed the Future?” will focus on insects as a nontraditional livestock, potential barriers to insect rearing and insect eating, or entomophagy, in the developed and developing world. The program is free and open to the public and also will be available for viewing live online.

Santa Cruz-Based Community Agroecology Network To Be Honored For Work In … – Patch.com


Patch.com

Santa Cruz-Based Community Agroecology Network To Be Honored For Work In
Patch.com
Santa Cruz-based Community Agroecology Network's (CAN) Food Security & Sovereignty in Las Segovias, Nicaragua project was selected as a finalist for the 2015 Specialty Coffee Association of America Sustainability Award. The recipients of the awards …

Will the World Bank get truly climate smart? – Bretton Woods Observer


Bretton Woods Observer

Will the World Bank get truly climate smart?
Bretton Woods Observer
Such intensified 'agroecological' farms can enhance food security, maintain greater levels of biodiversity, and provide resilience against climate extremes. But it will take a revolution in financial and economic incentives to allow them to compete

Experts, general public will gather for Eckerd Food Security Conference – Eckerd College News

Experts, general public will gather for Eckerd Food Security Conference
Eckerd College News
He has a bachelor's degree in plant science and biology at Dordt College and a master's degree and doctorate in agronomy, specializing in agro-ecology, from the University of Minnesota. He will discuss shifting the use of perennial grain crops away

International Symposium on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition Final Report

FAO held the International Symposium on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition at its headquarters in Rome on September 18 and 19, 2014. Approximately 400 people from 61 different countries (including Permanent Representatives and staff members of representations, FAO / IFAD / WFP staff members, their guests and external participants) attended the event and an additional 186 people followed the Symposium through live streaming.

Steve Gliessman, Chair of CAN’s Board of Directors, chaired the opening plenary. He noted that the focus of Agroecology was originally at the local systems level, but has gradually increased to entire food systems and is now understood as a participatory action research process that leads to sustainability and resilience, as a movement of change and justice.

Steve and Pablo Tittonell reported the key findings and emerging themes of the first one and half days to the plenary. The main findings were: “By the final wrap up session, it was clear that the ecological foundation and food system focus of Agroecology provides an action-oriented approach for simultaneously developing alternative food systems, while transforming the current industrial model. FAO is in a unique position to help build a global agroecological network. The Symposium emphatically demonstrated that the stakeholders represented have everything necessary to make this transformation happen. It only requires action, vision, responsibility towards future generations and above
all courage.”

Key Outcomes

The Symposium generated the following key outcomes:

  • a proposal to continue the dialogue initiated through three regional meetings to be held in 2015;
  • a large amount of scientific evidence and examples of best practices already adopted in many different ecologies and the commitment to finalize proceedings;
  • the recommendation to accompany countries requesting FAO’s assistance to promote national policy dialogue and research on Agroecology and expand partnership towards a local level;
  • recommendation to operationalize Agroecology into FAO’s operational Work Plan for SO2 and other SOs, and to mainstream some ongoing planned national activities and projects towards Agroecology.

Next Steps

Based on the success of the Symposium and FAO’s commitment to facilitate three regional meetings in 2015 in Latin America, Africa and Asia, FAO is looking forward to collaborate with the relevant interested actors on this action plan. More precisely, the Director-General outlined the following points as next steps for FAO:

  • FAO will organize three regional meetings in 2015 in Latin America, Africa and Asia, under the leadership of the Regional Offices (Brazilian government offered to host the Latin America meeting in collaboration with FAO-RLC);
  • The Director-General mentioned during the United Nations Climate Change Summit that participants of the International Symposium on Agroecology called for a United Nations wide initiative on Agroecology in order to help sustainably promote food security, address climate change and build resilience;
  • The Director-General appointed Ms. Maria Helena Semedo, DDG-N as the person responsible for this way forward.

To download the complete report, check here.

Central America’s food security threatened by drought – Deutsche Welle


Deutsche Welle

Central America's food security threatened by drought
Deutsche Welle
But now local populations are being encouraged to arm themselves in the fight for food security by diversifying their crops and engaging in climate smart practices such as agroforestry. Withered maize plantation in Honduras (Photo: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0:.

International Agroecology Forum to Address Food Security – The Daily Meal

International Agroecology Forum to Address Food Security
The Daily Meal
Agroecology techniques include integrated pest management, crop diversification, agroforestry, conservation tillage, and holistic landscape management. The forum in February 2015 seeks to strengthen the connections between agroecology-focused …

Africa Learns To Feed Itself From A New Era of Plant Breeders – Justmeans (blog)

Africa Learns To Feed Itself From A New Era of Plant Breeders
Justmeans (blog)
The Academy, a program of the African Orphan Crops Consortium, is based at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in Nairobi, and is designed to increase food security and helps eliminate malnutrition and stunting among Africa's youth. A total of 250

New Plant Breeding Academy Graduates To Improve Africa’s ‘Orphan’ Crops – EIN News (press release)

New Plant Breeding Academy Graduates To Improve Africa's 'Orphan' Crops
EIN News (press release)
The academy, a program of the African Orphan Crops Consortium, is based at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in Nairobi. It is designed to increase food security and help eliminate malnutrition and stunting among Africa's youth. A total of 250 new

and more »

Global change, climate change upend livelihoods, food security in the Amazon – Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)

Global change, climate change upend livelihoods, food security in the Amazon
Forests News, Center for International Forestry Research (blog)
“When space is limited, you need an agroforestry system,” said Løvold, whose organization worked with communities from 1991 to 2004 to revitalize degraded soil by adding organic material and introducing crop rotation and green manure. “It's totally

New UC Davis-run academy graduates to help Africa’s ‘orphan’ crops – Daily Democrat

New UC Davis-run academy graduates to help Africa's 'orphan' crops
Daily Democrat
The academy, a program of the African Orphan Crops Consortium, is based at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in Nairobi. It is designed to increase food security and help eliminate malnutrition and stunting among Africa's youth. A total of 250 new

New UC Davis-run academy graduates to help Africa’s ‘orphan’ crops – Daily … – Daily Democrat

New UC Davis-run academy graduates to help Africa's 'orphan' crops – Daily
Daily Democrat
The academy, a program of the African Orphan Crops Consortium, is based at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in Nairobi. It is designed to increase food security and help eliminate malnutrition and stunting among Africa's youth. A total of 250 new

New plant breeding academy graduates to improve Africa’s ‘orphan’ crops – UC Davis

New plant breeding academy graduates to improve Africa's 'orphan' crops
UC Davis
The academy, a program of the African Orphan Crops Consortium, is based at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in Nairobi. It is designed to increase food security and help eliminate malnutrition and stunting among Africa's youth. A total of 250 new

‘Home gardens’ can tackle poverty, need modernisation – Khaleej Times

'Home gardens' can tackle poverty, need modernisation
Khaleej Times
A form of agroforestry practised in lands adjoining residences in villages, HGs consist of multiple-farming components, such as crops, trees, shrubs, livestock and fishery, which to their keepers are crucial for livelihood, food security and ecosystem

‘Home gardens’ can tackle poverty, need modernisation, scientists say – gulfnews.com

'Home gardens' can tackle poverty, need modernisation, scientists say
gulfnews.com
A form of agroforestry practised in lands adjoining residences in villages, HGs consist of multiple-farming components, such as crops, trees, shrubs, livestock and fishery, which to their keepers are crucial for livelihood, food security and ecosystem

and more »

‘Home gardens’ can tackle poverty, need modernisation: Scientists – Daijiworld.com

'Home gardens' can tackle poverty, need modernisation: Scientists
Daijiworld.com
A form of agroforestry practised in lands adjoining residences in villages, HGs consist of multiple-farming components, such as crops, trees, shrubs, livestock and fishery, which to their keepers are crucial for livelihood, food security and ecosystem

and more »

‘Home gardens’ can tackle poverty, need modernisation: Scientists – Business Standard

'Home gardens' can tackle poverty, need modernisation: Scientists
Business Standard
A form of agroforestry practised in lands adjoining residences in villages, HGs consist of multiple-farming components, such as crops, trees, shrubs, livestock and fishery, which to their keepers are crucial for livelihood, food security and ecosystem

and more »

For more food and more resilience, turn to women – Thomson Reuters Foundation


The Hindu

For more food and more resilience, turn to women
Thomson Reuters Foundation
Participatory research in villages around the world has shown that a combination of improved farming practices, such as techniques that save irrigation water, more diversified crop farming systems like agroforestry, and tailored climate advisories
Smart agriculture for food security Chandigarh Tribune



all 228 news articles »

Smart agriculture for food security – Chandigarh Tribune


Chandigarh Tribune

Smart agriculture for food security
Chandigarh Tribune
Agroforestry promotes adaptation along with increased productivity. Smallholders plant trees on farms and field boundaries, integrated with crops and livestock, to enhance and diversify income, reduce risks and rejuvenate their natural resource base

and more »

Khanyile’s show to be beamed in 140 countries – Sowetan Live (press release) (registration) (blog)

Khanyile's show to be beamed in 140 countries
Sowetan Live (press release) (registration) (blog)
Khanyile says as part of the show she has visited projects like the World Agroforestry Centre in Nairobi, where they're sequencing the genomes of traditional African food crops. "We also focus on the subjects of education, agriculture and food security

Decline in soil fertility in Africa threatens food security – Study – GhanaWeb


GhanaWeb

Decline in soil fertility in Africa threatens food security – Study
GhanaWeb
… in partnership with the United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA), World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and Technische Universitat Dresden, Germany, is on the theme “Advancing Integrated Soil and Water Management

and more »

Indentify politicians willing to listen to food-security issues – Nanaimo News Bulletin

Indentify politicians willing to listen to food-security issues
Nanaimo News Bulletin
We also know that successive senior UN officials concerned with food security are calling for the rebuilding of local food systems and greater emphasis on agroecology and agroforestry. We know also that small farms produce more value per acre than huge …

FAO Journal Explores Agroforestry and Urban Food Security Links in Africa – IISD Reporting Services

FAO Journal Explores Agroforestry and Urban Food Security Links in Africa
IISD Reporting Services
FAO October 2014: The Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) has released Volume 28, Issue 2 of its 'Nature & Faune Journal,' which focuses on 'Sustainable Natural Resources Management in Africa's Urban Food and Nutrition Equation.'.

5 things we can do to better ensure food security – Devex

5 things we can do to better ensure food security
Devex
The combined expertise of AIRCA centers cover a large spectrum of the research for development continuum including agro-biodiversity, agroforestry, integrated pest management, drought-tolerant crops, natural resource management and the conservation …

Explaining the “Hungry Farmer Paradox”

Most of the world’s food insecure people live in marginal rural environments. A recent study with coffee producers in northern Nicaragua’s highlands helps explain this “hungry farmer paradox.” These small-scale farmers experienced an average of three months of seasonal hunger over the year studied. Although cash income helped alleviate food scarcity, households that produced more subsistence crops, especially corn and tree fruits, reported still shorter periods of food scarcity. Meanwhile, farmers that used several commonly promoted environmentally friendly farming practices reported no discernible impacts on seasonal hunger.

In an article published in Global Environmental Change, Santa Clara University researchers, including Chris Bacon (Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences), Bill Sundstrom (Department of Economics), and two recently graduated Environmental Studies and Sciences students Ian Dougherty (now with the United Farm Workers Foundation) and Rica Santos (now with the National Council for Science and the Environment), concur with previous studies finding that several factors influence farmer food insecurity, including: (1) annual cycles of precipitation and rising maize prices during the lean months; (2) inter annual droughts and periodic storms; and (3) the long-term inability of coffee harvests and prices to provide sufficient income.

This work identifies the need for balancing coffee production with food production and improving exchange systems to protect farmers from adverse seasonal price fluctuations. It also considers a participatory initiative that uses fair trade cooperatives to increase rural food access through the re-localization of food distribution networks, sustainable agriculture training, and improved food storage. Although crop loss from coffee leaf rust contributes an additional challenge, these and other integrated strategies hold the potential to reduce threats to food security, livelihoods, and biodiversity.

Chris Bacon and Ernesto Mendez are CAN affiliate researchers; Maria Eugenia Flores Gomez is the CAN project manager for the Las Segovias project

* Bacon, C. M., Sundstrom, W. A., Flores Gómez, M. E., Ernesto Méndez, V., Santos, R., Goldoftas, B., & Dougherty, I. (2014). Explaining the ‘hungry farmer paradox’: Smallholders and fair trade cooperatives navigate seasonality and change in Nicaragua’s corn and coffee markets. Global Environmental Change, 25 (2014) 133–149

Author Affiliations

Christopher M. Bacon, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

William A. Sundstrom, Department of Economics, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA

 María Eugenia Flores Gómez, Community Agroecology Network, 595 Franklin Street, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA

 Ernesto Méndez, Environmental Program and Plant and Soil Science Department, University of Vermont,
The Bittersweet – 153 South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, USA

 Rica Santos, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

 Barbara Goldoftas, International Development, Community, & Environment Department, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610, USA

 Ian Dougherty, Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95050-4901, USA

FAO, NGOs Assess 5 Years of Committee on World Food Security, Voice of Civil … – EIN News (press release)

FAO, NGOs Assess 5 Years of Committee on World Food Security, Voice of Civil
EIN News (press release)
“You have helped introducing important ideas such as Food Sovereignty or Agro-Ecology in the international agenda,” he added. The purpose of the CSM is to facilitate civil society participation in agriculture, food security and nutrition policy

and more »

The Committee On World Food Security 5 Years Later – an Assessment By Civil … – AllAfrica.com

The Committee On World Food Security 5 Years Later – an Assessment By Civil
AllAfrica.com
"You have helped introducing important ideas such as Food Sovereignty or Agro-Ecology in the international agenda," he added. The purpose of the CSM is to facilitate civil society participation in agriculture, food security and nutrition policy

and more »

UN-backed forum spotlights civil society’s role in fighting hunger, developing … – UN News Centre


UN News Centre

UN-backed forum spotlights civil society's role in fighting hunger, developing
UN News Centre
“You have helped introducing important ideas such as Food Sovereignty or Agro-Ecology in the international agenda,” he added. Today's meeting marks the third year in which the Civil Society Mechanism holds its annual forum at FAO headquarters. The aim …
The Committee on World Food Security 5 years later: an assessment by civil Thomson Reuters Foundation



all 2 news articles »

The Committee on World Food Security 5 years later: an assessment by civil … – Thomson Reuters Foundation

The Committee on World Food Security 5 years later: an assessment by civil
Thomson Reuters Foundation
"You have helped introducing important ideas such as Food Sovereignty or Agro-Ecology in the international agenda," he added. The purpose of the CSM is to facilitate civil society participation in agriculture, food security and nutrition policy

Revisiting the “Thin Months” | co-authored by CAN affiliated-researcher, Ernesto Méndez


Revisiting the “Thin Months” — A Follow-Up Study on the Livelihoods of Mesoamerican Coffee Farmers.

Read this policy brief co-authored by CAN affiliated-researcher, Ernesto Méndez (Director, Agricultural and Rural Livelihoods Group, University of Vermont).

“Smallholder coffee farmers in Mesoamerica face formidable challenges, including highly variable coffee prices, increasing climate change impacts, and worsening outbreaks of pests and diseases, which contribute to chronic debt and food insecurity. Despite these difficulties, the results of a recent follow-up or longitudinal survey show improvement in key aspects of farmers’ livelihoods, though there is an urgent need to continue working with farmers on these issues. The findings point to promising strategies for enhancing livelihoods, including carefully selected crop diversification practices to improve food security; site-specific instead of blanket recommendations for improved agricultural management and livelihood diversification; access to affordable financing and training in financial literacy; and other education and training programs for farmers. …”

 

Opening a Window in the Cathedral of the Green Revolution | Steve Gliessman and Pablo Tittonell

Posted in: News   Topics: Agroecology and Food Systems,


“Agroecology is opening a window in the ‘Cathedral of the Green Revolution.” With these words, the Director General of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Dr. José Graziano da Silva, began his closing remarks at the end of the two-day symposium titled “Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition,” held at FAO’s headquarters in Rome, Italy, September 18-19, 2014. He was referring to the impressive results of two days of presentations, discussions, and debate about how agroecology must be considered as a key focus for developing global alternatives for solving the complex issues of hunger, poverty, food production, climate change, and agricultural sustainability.

More than 400 participants from over 30 countries gathered to take part in what was a ground-breaking symposium. For the first time the FAO considered the importance of agroecology as an organizing principle for future programs in food security and nutrition. The focus was not just on increasing production. It was on understanding food systems as cultural systems, with people at the center of the system, rather than the current industrial model focused on yield maximization at all costs, the use of non-renewable resources, and using all available production technologies. Ecological and social diversity and complexity, rather than simplicity and homogeneity, were called for as alternatives to the extractive and degrading monoculture approach that dominates the world’s food systems today.

Download the complete editorial by Steve Gliessman and Pablo Tittonell. [Reprinted with permission: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems Volume 39, issue 2 (In Press)]
.pdf

Food Security and Sovereignty in Las Segovias, Nicaragua

ANNUAL REPORT: Year 4 — November 1, 2012 – October 30, 2013

Julisa_MalangaTree_

Through the Food Security and Sovereignty in Las Segovias Project the Community Agroecology Network (CAN), in collaboration with our partner organization PRODECOOP, RL, aims to improve food security and reduce seasonal hunger among 1500 smallholder coffee farming families in Northern Nicaragua.

Artesanal Cement Water-Storage Cisterns Workshop


Quintana Roo, México: CAN is fostering cross-pollination of agroecological knowledge and technologies in its network! This week, members of our partner organization Vinculación y Desarrollo en el Café, AC (VIDA AC) in Veracruz, México travelled to Quintana Roo, México to conduct a 4-day workshop on the construction of artesanal cement water storage cisterns. Forty women, youth, and men from CAN and Universidad Intercultural Maya University of Quintana Roo’s (UIMQRoo) collaborative food security project took part in the workshop, as well as students and professors from UIMQRoo. The aim of the workshop is to stimulate the building of more cisterns to store water from the rainy season to irrigate home gardens during the dry season, making food production possible year round.

Climate Change Requires New Approaches to Food Security – Triple Pundit


Triple Pundit

Climate Change Requires New Approaches to Food Security
Triple Pundit
Graziano da Silva also highlighted “agro-ecology” as a promising approach to moving food production onto a more sustainable path. FAO recently hosted a meeting on this approach; participants called for a U.N.-wide initiative on agro-ecology in order to
World needs 'paradigm shift' towards sustainable agriculture, UN agency urges UN News Centre


FAO Calls for 'Paradigm Shift' Towards Sustainable Agriculture and Family Insurance News Net
Farming Must Adapt to Sustainable Farming TheCattleSite

all 48 news articles »

Agroecology and Social Transformation


Reprinted from: Gliessman, S.R. 2014. “Agroecology and Social Transformation. Editorial.” Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. Volume 38, issue 1.

Agroecology and Social Transformation

With its foundation in the three interconnected areas of science, practice, and social change movements, agroecology must position itself to guarantee food sovereignty, food security, and food justice for all people, in rural as well as urban communities.  This will require the transformation of the current agro-food system that has created an extensive environmental, political, economic, financial, and food system crisis. This crisis faces all of modern civilization, by the expanding inequality, increasing poverty, and environmental degradation caused by the multi-national corporations that monopolize the modern food chain.   Add to this climate change and the disastrous impact of the current coffee rust epidemic in Central America, and the urgency for food system transformation is paramount. We look to agroecology for ways to ensure this transformation happens as soon as possible.

The above paragraph is a summary of the declaration drawn up by the 45 participants from 11 countries in the 15th International Agroecology Shortcourse that took place at the Estelimar Center in Estelí, Nicaragua July 6-18, 2014. Co-sponsored by the non-profit Community Agroecology Network (CAN) and The Association for Social Development of Nicaragua (ASDENIC), the course was titled “Agroecology and Social Transformation: transdisciplinarity, health, and human development.” Through a combination of lectures, community forums, posters, panel discussions, site visits, and participatory interactions in communities where agroecological transformation is in progress, participants received a broad introduction to agroecology as an action-oriented endeavor. Everyone came away with the full realization that agroecology offers important tools for transforming food systems by working at the local level and with local knowledge as a foundation. From there, science and practice can be linked to establish alternative food systems for all people, and can provide models for the transformation of our food systems to sustainability.

At the same time, course participants voiced strongly that agroecology must not be captured by or try to conform its goals and objectives to the current food system. By linking ways of knowing and different knowledge systems from which can emerge new ways of action, the transdisciplinary power of agroecology can emerge and truly transformative change will occur. To learn more about the course, visit the CAN website in English at www.canunite.org, or the ASDENIC website in Spanish at www.asdenic.org.

This important theme is highlighted in the article by Levidow et al. (2014) in this issue of Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems.  If agroecology is going to contribute to real change, especially away from the monocultural, large-scale, external input-intensive, socially unjust, and corporate concentration of the current industrial model of food systems, the commitment to transformational change and alignment with social movements working for food system change is paramount. The attempt to consider the approach of “sustainable intensification” as agroecology is an example of conforming with the current paradigm.  Intensification focused primarily on increasing yields and efficiency, without changing the dominant paradigm, is not sustainable nor is it agroecology in its complete definition. 

Our journal looks forward to promoting and publishing examples of “transformational” agroecology, where science, productive practice, and social change are combined. This is why we are the journal of Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems.

Steve Gliessman

Editor, Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

Reference: Levidow, L., M. Pimbert, and G. Vanloqueren.  2014. “Agroecological research: Conforming – or transforming the dominant agro-food regime?” Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 38(10): In press.

 

 

New Approaches to Agriculture Needed to Cope with Climate Change – TheCattleSite


TheCattleSite

New Approaches to Agriculture Needed to Cope with Climate Change
TheCattleSite
Last week, FAO hosted a major event on the approach at its Rome headquarters, where participants called for UN-wide initiative on agro-ecology in order to help sustainably promote food security, address climate change, and build resilience. "There are …
Climate Change Affects Food Access, a Top Reason for World Hunger, FAO Virtual-Strategy Magazine (press release)



all 8 news articles »

New Alliance for Food Security, Nutrition in Africa progresses – spyghana.com

New Alliance for Food Security, Nutrition in Africa progresses
spyghana.com
Support adoption of agroecological practices by small-scale farmers to build resilience through: participatory research in agroecology; dissemination of ecological farming knowledge via farmer-to-farmer networks; and capacity-building of extension

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2014 Annual Report of Community Agroecology Network

Posted in: News   Topics: About CAN,


In the past year, CAN has worked with more than 2,000 families to improve food security through homegardens, seed banks, basic grain storage, and soil fertility. Women have been leaders in strengthening local food economies, such as the agroecological farmers market in Quintana Roo and a women-run café in San Ramón. We held transparent negotiations with the participation of coffee farmers, producers organizations, an importer and roasters to bring 25,000 lbs of AgroEco® Coffee to California. We cultivated the next generation of food systems leaders through international exchanges and courses. These achievements are possible because of our supporters. To learn more, please review our annual report.

Working together to improve knowledge of agrobiodiversity maintenance and use – Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research

Working together to improve knowledge of agrobiodiversity maintenance and use
Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research
round-fao FAO will host an International Symposium on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition from 18th to 19th September to explore recent scientific research and knowledge and promote open dialogue while showcasing existing experiences and …

Why dairy industry important in improving food security, nutrition – IPPmedia


IPPmedia

Why dairy industry important in improving food security, nutrition
IPPmedia
Heifer International and its partners in the EADD project-TechnoServe, International Livestock research Institute, African Breeders Services and World Agroforestry Centre, continue their efforts to make connections between a variety of stakeholders

Message to United Nations: Small Farmers Are Key to Reversing Climate … – Nassau News Live

Message to United Nations: Small Farmers Are Key to Reversing Climate
Nassau News Live
This can only be addressed by shifting current industrial agricultural practices to diversified food systems focused on food security and agroecology. Fortifying and safeguarding small-scale farmers is the best remedy to address rural unemployment and …

and more »

Message to United Nations: Small Farmers Are Key to Reversing Climate … – SYS-CON Media (press release)

Message to United Nations: Small Farmers Are Key to Reversing Climate
SYS-CON Media (press release)
This can only be addressed by shifting current industrial agricultural practices to diversified food systems focused on food security and agroecology. Fortifying and safeguarding small-scale farmers is the best remedy to address rural unemployment and …

and more »

Message to United Nations: Small Farmers Are Key to Reversing Climate … – PR Newswire (press release)

Message to United Nations: Small Farmers Are Key to Reversing Climate
PR Newswire (press release)
This can only be addressed by shifting current industrial agricultural practices to diversified food systems focused on food security and agroecology. Fortifying and safeguarding small-scale farmers is the best remedy to address rural unemployment and …

and more »

Doctoral candidate raises students’ awareness of food systems issues

When Lauren Chenarides joined the Penn State-led research project called Enhancing Food Security in the Northeast through Regional Food Systems, she knew she’d be getting a rich experience in food systems research. But Chenarides also did some training herself, teaching a course that immersed 40 Penn State undergraduates in the concepts of food access, food security and regional food systems.

CAN 2014 Fuller Challenge Semi-Finalist!

Posted in: News   Topics: About CAN,


26 August 2014. Today Executive Director Roseann Cohen announced that CAN’s International Youth Network for Food Security and Sovereignty has been selected as one of 20 semi-finalists in the 2014 Fuller Challenge. Named “Socially Responsible Design’s Highest Award,” the Fuller Challenge invites scientists, designers, architects, activists, entrepreneurs, artists and planners from all over the world to submit their innovative solutions to some of humanity’s most pressing problems. A $100,000 prize is awarded to support the development and implementation of one outstanding strategy.

International Youth Network for Food Security and Sovereignty trains rural youth in Mexico and Central America in a highly participatory process to develop sustainable food systems in their communities through social, ecological and technological innovation. With a broader goal of agro-ecological transformation across Central America and beyond, the network seeks to re-imbue communities with traditional ecological values while drawing from modern best practices. Trained and empowered youth leaders are the ideal vectors to propagate genuine sustainability.

Twenty Semi-Finalist proposals, including CAN’s, have been selected out of an entry pool of over 450 applications and have undergone a rigorous review for adherence to the seven-point Challenge criteria: Visionary, Comprehensive, Ecologically Responsible, Feasible, Verifiable, and Replicable. CAN’sapplication has been through three rounds of vetting by the members of the Challenge Review Committee, including analysis and evaluation by an interdisciplinary team of experts and advisors.

The finalists will be announced in the fall.

 

 

Oryza Shares Press Release: Food Security Summit on Agricultural and Nutrition … – Oryza

Oryza Shares Press Release: Food Security Summit on Agricultural and Nutrition
Oryza
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, Farming First, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific – TheCropSite


TheCropSite

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific
TheCropSite
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …

Multinational land grabs and productivity – nation.lk – The Nation Newspaper


nation.lk – The Nation Newspaper

Multinational land grabs and productivity
nation.lk – The Nation Newspaper
Numerous high level reports from the UN and development agencies have argued in favor of small farmers and agro-ecology. However, the bedrock of food production and food security – the small farmer – faces marginalization and economic distress.

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific – TheCattleSite


TheCattleSite

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific
TheCattleSite
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …
Summit to Explore Solutions to Asia Pacific Food Security ThePoultrySite.com



all 4 news articles »

Summit to Explore Solutions to Asia Pacific Food Security – ThePoultrySite.com

Summit to Explore Solutions to Asia Pacific Food Security
ThePoultrySite.com
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific – ThePigSite.com

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific
ThePigSite.com
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …

The Worldwide Destruction of the Family Farm. Wall Street’s Unprecedented … – Center for Research on Globalization

The Worldwide Destruction of the Family Farm. Wall Street's Unprecedented
Center for Research on Globalization
Numerous high level reports from the UN and development agencies have argued in favour of small farmers and agro-ecology. However,the bedrock of food production and food security – the small farmer – faces marginalisation and economic distress.

Government for Innovative Agriculture in Food Security Quest – AllAfrica.com

Government for Innovative Agriculture in Food Security Quest
AllAfrica.com
Sphiwe Mauwa, Chairperson of Program Steering Committee (PSC) of Agroforestry Food Security Program (AFSP) made the remarks Thursday during the official opening of day long AFSP II Mid-Term Review workshop at Golden Peacock hotel in Lilongwe …

XV Annual International Agroecology Shortcourse | La Pita Community Visit Wrap-Up


La Pita Community Visit Wrap-Up

Our two-day visit to Denis Guiterrez Cooperative in the community of La Pita felt as though we had traveled to another world where campesino families opened their homes and their lives to us. Steve (Gliessman) and I had been here 18 months ago with the AgroEco® Coffee Tour and we were so impressed with the multitude of changes that have taken place since then. The crisis of “la roya” killing the coffee plants has deepened, but the community is responding with resilience. Not only are they replanting their coffee parcels, but the women’s group is making their own fertilizer to rebuild the soil. As part of CAN’s Food Security Project, youth leaders are working with the women’s group to plant home gardens to feed the families and to sell extra produce in a monthly Farmers Market.

There is a feeling of hope growing in La Pita as the families are improving their land and diversifying their crops and their income sources.

See photos.

 

Can ‘agroecology’ bring food security to Latin America? – The Guardian


The Guardian

Can 'agroecology' bring food security to Latin America?
The Guardian
She has travelled more than two days by bus to participate in the national agroecology meeting, in Juazeiro, Bahia. With a shining smile, she says that for the past six years they have grown more than 30 types of crops with no pesticides at Roseli

How to stop climate change making food less nutritious? – eco-business.com


eco-business.com

How to stop climate change making food less nutritious?
eco-business.com
The ability to generate surplus incomes from agricultural practices has dramatically contributed to the food security of these households, while improving efficiency and encouraging better agroforestry practices. In Zambia, a project introduced

How to stop climate change making food less nutritious? – Thomson Reuters Foundation

How to stop climate change making food less nutritious?
Thomson Reuters Foundation
The ability to generate surplus incomes from agricultural practices has dramatically contributed to the food security of these households, while improving efficiency and encouraging better agroforestry practices. In Zambia, a project introduced

and more »

XV International Agroecology Shortcourse | Day 2


XV Annual International Agroecology Shortcourse
Shortcourse 2014 – Update #2

The morning session of day two of the Shortcourse was an opportunity for participating organizations to share examples of how they are integrating agroecology into their work. Course participants attended a public forum held on the local campus of the Universidad Nacional Aútonoma Nicaragua. Here presidents, deans, and administrators from five universities and one research organization discussed ways in which they are integrating teaching and research in agroecology into their programs. We were reminded of the importance of the annual Shortcourses as opportunities to share and inspire one another when Dr. Dennis Salazar, one of the panelists, pointed out that Nicaragua now has both Masters and Doctorate programs in agroecology — these programs were first envisioned by participants at the 2006 International Agroecology Shortcourse held in Matagalpa, Nicaragua.

Merling Preza, general manager of the coffee cooperative PRODECOOP and an international leader in just trade and food security for small-scale coffee farmers and their families, gave a presentation on the important role of cooperatives — not only for marketing coffee, but also in helping their membership develop healthy food systems to feed their families.

As part of the afternoon activities, course participants went on a tour of the demonstration farm where the Shortcourse is being held. CII-ASDENIC, this year’s Shortcourse host, runs the farm. They conduct trainings on sustainable farming systems for youth from the surrounding coffee-growing communities.

The day’s events came to a close with a presentation given by CAN’s executive director, Dr. Roseann Cohen. Rose spoke about CAN’s work and our affiliated farmer organizations, universities, NGOs, and researchers who make up the CAN network. Connecting to the theme of the short course, Rose closed with a slide that shows the areas where CAN engages the principles of agroecology to bring about a socially just food system:

  • developing local control over agricultural resources
  • introducing sustainable farming practices
  • developing alternative food economies (such as farmers markets)
  • empowering women and youth as key leaders in the food system
  • developing intercultural relationships.

Roberta (Robbie) Jaffe
Board of Directors, CAN

Report from XV Agroecology Shortcourse


Shortcourse 2014 Update #1
Estelí, Nicaragua
8 July 2014

The 15th Annual International Agroecology Shortcourse, hosted by Community Agroecology Network’s (CAN) partner organization, CII-ASDENIC, kicked off on July 6 in Estelí, Nicaragua. Forty-five participants from 11 countries joined together to learn and share their experiences in agroecology. Over a two-week period, CAN affiliated researchers and representatives of local organizations will share their experiences and knowledge related to agroecology and discuss how this is a key component of social change in the local and global food system.

The course opened with Steve Gliessman, president of CAN’s Board of Directors and course leader, posing the question What is Agroecology? The group wove together their understanding of agroecology: from the farm to the people, to the connection of food to the environment to sustainability, to how to build the soil and develop a cyclical nutrient system. Throughout the course, the group will explore: “How do we know if a farm system and the whole food system is sustainable?”

Midway through the course, participants will divide into four groups. Each group will spend two days in different rural communities looking at indicators of agroecology and sustainability. In the field, groups will be able to observe the farms and talk to the farmers, their families, and the organizations CAN partners with to learn about CAN’s action research initiatives in Nicaragua that are using principles of agroecology to alleviate the “thin months” (months when farm families do not have enough food to feed themselves.)

Each Agroecology Shortcourse is developed around the host region. This year, in Estelí, which is located in the Las Segovias region of northern Nicaragua, we are in the middle of small landholders’ coffee farms. These farmers, who work the land to provide coffee world-wide, often don’t have enough food to feed their own families year round. To address this problem, CAN has been working with our partners, the coffee cooperative PRODECOOP and the non-governmental organization CII-ASDENIC, on projects to eliminate the thin months. Specifically, our projects bring ways to store grains and increase crop diversity on the farms.

In addition to the challenge of thin months, over the past few years, the coffee in Nicaragua and throughout Central America has been hit by a devastating disease, “la roya,” or coffee rust, which is killing the coffee plants and drastically limiting production.

How is la roya connected to climate change? What is the best approach to recover from this disease? How does the food system need to change so that farmers are not highly vulnerable to stresses, such as la roya? How will farmers feed their families in the meantime? Within these questions in mind, participants consider this shortcourse’s theme: Agroecology and Social Change.

We will explore the theme conceptually in the classroom and experience it in the field as participants connect with each other to develop their understanding of agroecology and how they can take it home with them to their own regions around the world. Over the next two weeks I hope to share experiences and learnings of the shortcourse with you. I hope you’ll stay tuned.

Learn More:

 

 

Steve Gliessman Named to Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems (IPES-Food)

Posted in: News   Topics: About CAN,


CAN’s co-founder and chair of the Board of Directors, Dr. Stephen Gliessman, (Professor Emeritus of Agroecology, University of California, Santa Cruz) has been appointed to an international panel of experts on sustainable food systems. The panel is co-chaired by Dr. Olivia Yambi, nutritionist and former UNICEF representative to Kenya, and Prof. Olivier De Schutter, who recently completed his term as U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. 

The Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation established the IPES-Food initiative, which addresses one of the three areas of action targeted by the International Scientific Committee of the Foundation: evidence-based advocacy on sustainable food systems and diets. The aim is to provide “…policy makers, the private sector and the public at large with the evidence to guide a transition towards sustainable food systems and diets.”
Steve tells us that the plan is for the Panel to be affiliated with the United Nations, probably the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Over a period of three years, the Panel will prepare a vision for the future of food, as well as an agenda for change that will be backed by the latest research, similar to the recent report of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Steve is one of the first 10 experts invited to join the Panel, which will eventually include 20–30 interdisciplinary international experts in all food-system components. Discussing the work of the panel, Oliver De Schutter stated: “Producing more food will not do. Food systems must be reshaped with a view to ensuring social equity and the reduction of rural poverty, protecting our resource base and delivering better health outcomes.  Multidisciplinary research is urgently needed to promote adequate solutions at policy and global levels. And it must include an analysis of consumer behaviour, to encourage sustainable consumption as an integral part of food systems reform.”

In mid-September 2014, Steve will be traveling to Rome, Italy, to participate in a FAO-sponsored International Agroecology Conference for Food Security and Nutrition. Steve is chairing the first day of the event, where a large group of international researchers will be presenting their projects and results. In addition to his work on the Panel, Steve has also been invited by the Smith Foundation to present his agroecological vision at a meeting of their board of directors in November, as well as help guide some of their future grant giving.

At the upcoming XV Annual International Agroecology Shortcourse (July 6-18, 2014) in Estelí, Nicaragua, Steve and CAN-affiliated researchers will be developing ideas for research projects that will involve all of the CAN network and demonstrate how to do Agroecology. Check back for updates later this summer.

Links:
Agroecology: The Ecology of Sustainable Food Systems
[
Steve Gliessman, author]

Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
[Steve Gliessman, editor: This journal is devoted to the rapidly emerging fields of agroecology and sustainable agriculture. The journal focuses on the changes that need to occur in the design and management of our food systems in order to balance natural resource use and environmental protection with the needs of production, economic viability, and social well-being.]

 

 

Report from CAN’s 4th Annual Youth Exchange


May 15-23, 2014: CAN’s 4th Annual Youth Exchange or Intercambio took place in the coffee-growing highlands of Veracruz, México. The Youth Exchange brought 32 youth leaders together to share experiences and knowledge about building food in their own communities. The majority of the youth are leaders or promotores from CAN’s Food Security and Sovereignty Initiatives in Nicaragua (San Ramón and Las Segovias) and México (Quintana Roo and Veracruz). The youth leaders were joined by university students from the Universidad Autónoma Chapingo in Veracruz, and the University of California, Santa Cruz. CAN’s partner in Veracruz, VIDA A.C., hosted the Youth Exchange.

Learn more

Reflections of Bianca Tornero, a student participant in the 4th Annual Youth Exchange: My experience at the youth exchange was empowering and very inspirational. By working with this group of youth and seeing their life experiences, I was able to really understand what food sovereignty means and that agroecology is a way of living — it isn’t just a certification that can be given. In class, we always talk about how in a hypothetical world it would be great to have people fighting for their rights to reclaim their land and health. Here, I was able to see what these people are doing and how they are fighting for their communities. This is what we always talk about in class, but actually seeing and meeting these people was just incredible. This trip reinforced my interest in my studies. Once I graduate I want to continue working with communities like these, searching for a more just and healthy society, not only locally but also globally. This trip really changed me. I’ve fallen in love with what I care about all over again.

 

 

Major meeting to propose large-scale solutions to landscape challenges in Africa – Phys.Org

Major meeting to propose large-scale solutions to landscape challenges in Africa
Phys.Org
The Conference is being hosted by the World Agroforestry Centre on behalf of the Landscapes for People, Food and Nature Initiative, a global partnership of leading conservation, agriculture and food security organizations. The conference will look to

FAO: forests vital in sustainable development and reducing poverty – Blue & Green Tomorrow


Blue & Green Tomorrow

FAO: forests vital in sustainable development and reducing poverty
Blue & Green Tomorrow
Eva Mueller, director of the FAO's forestry division, added, “Forests, trees, farms and agroforestry systems contribute to food security, nutrition and livelihoods in several ways including as a direct source of food, fuel, employment and income. “As

and more »