allAfrica.com: Uganda: Does Farming in Wetlands Contribute to Development? – AllAfrica.com

allAfrica.com: Uganda: Does Farming in Wetlands Contribute to Development?
AllAfrica.com
Climate-smart agriculture entails agroforestry, rainwater harvesting, irrigation, and absolute observation of all environment protection regulations. It seems fine to dig up trenches in a wetland and do everything possible to set up a crop farm and

Does Farming in Wetlands Contribute to Development? – AllAfrica.com

Does Farming in Wetlands Contribute to Development?
AllAfrica.com
Climate-smart agriculture entails agroforestry, rainwater harvesting, irrigation, and absolute observation of all environment protection regulations. It seems fine to dig up trenches in a wetland and do everything possible to set up a crop farm and

and more »

Of the Pope’s Visit, Climate Change, and Agriculture – AllAfrica.com

Of the Pope's Visit, Climate Change, and Agriculture
AllAfrica.com
Ahead of the Pope's visit, we should start practicing "climate smart agriculture" by investing in agroforestry and, as indicated by the International Fund for Agricultural Development–water resources management, rainwater harvesting, irrigation

and more »

Using lasers to level farm land saves water and energy – Christian Science Monitor


Christian Science Monitor

Using lasers to level farm land saves water and energy
Christian Science Monitor
When combined with other resource-saving practices and technologies like solar irrigation, agroforestry and proper residue management, the gains can be multiplied for each farmer and the community as a whole. As a standalone intervention, the benefits …

Inter-basin dispersal through irrigation canals explains low genetic structure in Diplomystes cf. chilensis, an endangered freshwater catfish from Central Chile

Publication date: Available online 19 May 2015
Source:Limnologica – Ecology and Management of Inland Waters
Author(s): C.P. Muñoz-Ramírez , P.F. Victoriano , E. Habit
Biotic homogenization in freshwater ecosystems is a growing concern among conservation biologists. Recent phylogeographic data has shown low genetic structure between some basins from Central Chile, hypothesizing that either current dispersal through irrigation canals or incomplete lineage sorting due to recent divergence might explain the observed patterns. However, these hypotheses remain untested despite their potential implications for freshwater biodiversity and conservation. We used a statistical, model-based framework (approximate Bayesian computation) to investigate the relative support for each of these hypotheses. Our results show strong support for the model involving current migration between basins, and rejected the model of recent divergence without migration. These results strongly suggest that irrigation canals are facilitating the dispersal between basins, posing a serious threat to biodiversity in Central Chile, an area considered a biodiversity hotspot. Finally, these results highlight the utility of model-based approaches for determining demographic processes with potential conservation implications, even with the lack of extensive molecular data.

Report from the Field | Quintana Roo

CAN Associate Director Heather Putnam recently visited the Zona Maya in Quintana Roo, Mexico to meet with women’s groups working with CAN and the Intercultural Maya University of Quintana Roo (UIMQRoo) to improve household food security and sovereignty in a two year project funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Here is her report from the field.

I traveled with Robin Pacheco, a project field technician, and three UIMQRoo students working in the field, to four of the six rural communities we are working with in the Zona Maya. The goal of the collaborative project between CAN and UIMQRoo is to improve household food security and nutrition by promoting increased production diversity (more vegetables and protein sources) and income diversification.  The project team on the ground make up of professors, field technicians, and students works directly with small groups of indigenous Maya women in the communities to strengthen traditional and agroecological food production practices, establish direct market channels between the women’s groups and local and regional venues like restaurants and markets, and also to ensure the long-term sustainability of the women’s groups themselves to operate these enterprises.

Our first stop was the community of Kancabchen, a community that was recently integrated into the project in October 2014. The eight women there established their vegetable gardens in October, and have now expanded their home production from yams, beans, and tomatoes to include habanero chile, green chiles, Maya squash, cilantro, radishes, and cucumbers. They told me that they were happy to have these products available right behind their houses for their families’ tables. Lidia Moo Poot, the president of the women’s organization, told me “Now we can have confidence in what we eat and what it contains. Our children will grow up healthier.”

The women were were excited to have participated for the first time the previous Saturday in the monthly tianguis, or farmers market, organized by UIMQRoo in José Mariá Morelos , where they enjoyed telling consumers there about their agroecologically grown produce. The women are looking forward to getting more training in the production of organic fertilizers, and to completing the fences around their gardens to keep animals out. One challenge that is worrisome is the unseasonal drought that is affecting production; the rains should have arrived in the middle of March, but as of the end of April still had not. We talked about the need to install water catchment systems to ensure that families could continue to produce diverse nutritious foods throughout the year, even as climate change brings more seasonal drought.

I also visited the communities of Candelaria, Bulukax, and Tabasco and spoke with the women’s groups there. The women in Candelaria are expanding their chicken and egg production through the project and are anticipating have enough hens producing enough eggs to bring to market in about six months. In the meantime they will be working with the team at UIMQRoo to establish relationships with buyers who will value the organic production and healthiness of their eggs.  In Bulukax and Tabasco my conversations with the women’s groups were dominated by their worries about water — they are affected not only by the drought, but by salty groundwater or chlorinated municipal water, both unfit for irrigation.  These conversations only reinforced by understanding of the urgency of focusing on ways to improve water access; any changes we hope to make in increasing the availability of healthy and nutritious foods year round will depend on water.

Hazelnut industry on the grow in southwestern… – www.norfolknews.ca/


www.norfolknews.ca/

Hazelnut industry on the grow in southwestern…
www.norfolknews.ca/
“Tobacco soil would be good for hazelnuts,” said Todd Leuty, agroforestry specialist for the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. “Hazelnuts prefer sandy loam – deep, sandy loam soil. Access to irrigation is important. Not as

Kenya launches Africa’s first water fund to combat shortages – Business Insider

Kenya launches Africa's first water fund to combat shortages
Business Insider
The fund plans to invest in agroforestry, drip irrigation, terracing and planting vegetation on riverbanks. It has started a pilot in which 5,000 farmers belonging to the Green Belt Movement, founded by Kenya's Nobel Peace Prize laureate, the late

and more »

200 Jamaicans graduate from Climate-Smart Agriculture Training Program – Go Jamaica (press release)

200 Jamaicans graduate from Climate-Smart Agriculture Training Program
Go Jamaica (press release)
Agroforestry; rain water harvesting; water use-efficiency, which included micro-irrigation, mulching; and agro-meteorology techniques were taught to participants to ensure that their experience with the Farmer Field School was a rounded one. Jamaica's …

UW Extension, Sublette County weed and pest sponsor free hay workshop – High Plains Journal

UW Extension, Sublette County weed and pest sponsor free hay workshop
High Plains Journal
Weed-free forage and improving irrigation efficiency are among five topics at the free hay workshop Feb. 20, south of Pinedale. Sessions are 3:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Sublette County Weed and Pest District (SCWP) facility, 12 S. Bench Rd. The University

Smart Solar Irrigation In Senegal Offers Pay-As-You-Go Power – CleanTechnica


CleanTechnica

Smart Solar Irrigation In Senegal Offers Pay-As-You-Go Power
CleanTechnica
In rural areas of Senegal, getting water for irrigating crops often comes with a hefty price tag, not only in terms of the cost to buy the fuel for it (about $1 per day for an average gas-powered irrigation pump), and the time necessary to procure it

Why Solving Inequality is Key to a Climate Smart and Food Secure Future – The Daily Meal

Why Solving Inequality is Key to a Climate Smart and Food Secure Future
The Daily Meal
Participatory research in villages around the world has shown that improved farming practices (e.g. techniques that save irrigation water; more diversified crop farming systems like agroforestry; and tailored climate advisories through mobile phones

In California, Saving Water Is All Over the Map – Wall Street Journal

In California, Saving Water Is All Over the Map
Wall Street Journal
Sepp is a leader in the Agroecology or Agroforestry movement. His yields exceed those conventional agriculture obtains. He uses no pesticides or herbicides. He might irrigate selectively in the beginning, but the goal he achieves is no irrigation.

and more »

For more food and more resilience, turn to women – Thomson Reuters Foundation


The Hindu

For more food and more resilience, turn to women
Thomson Reuters Foundation
Participatory research in villages around the world has shown that a combination of improved farming practices, such as techniques that save irrigation water, more diversified crop farming systems like agroforestry, and tailored climate advisories
Smart agriculture for food security Chandigarh Tribune



all 228 news articles »

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming – Daily Democrat

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming
Daily Democrat
Martha Brown, principal editor at the UCSC Center for Agroecology, agreed. "You have to have pretty specific climates and soil types to do it," she said. "You can't just say let's replace all irrigated farms with dry farming." A drought can hurt dry

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Martha Brown, principal editor at the UCSC Center for Agroecology, agreed. "You have to have pretty specific climates and soil types to do it," she said. "You can't just say let's replace all irrigated farms with dry farming." A drought can hurt dry

and more »

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming – Monterey County Herald

Soquel vineyard cuts water use through dry farming
Monterey County Herald
Martha Brown, principal editor at the UCSC Center for Agroecology, agreed. "You have to have pretty specific climates and soil types to do it," she said. "You can't just say let's replace all irrigated farms with dry farming." A drought can hurt dry

Artesanal Cement Water-Storage Cisterns Workshop


Quintana Roo, México: CAN is fostering cross-pollination of agroecological knowledge and technologies in its network! This week, members of our partner organization Vinculación y Desarrollo en el Café, AC (VIDA AC) in Veracruz, México travelled to Quintana Roo, México to conduct a 4-day workshop on the construction of artesanal cement water storage cisterns. Forty women, youth, and men from CAN and Universidad Intercultural Maya University of Quintana Roo’s (UIMQRoo) collaborative food security project took part in the workshop, as well as students and professors from UIMQRoo. The aim of the workshop is to stimulate the building of more cisterns to store water from the rainy season to irrigate home gardens during the dry season, making food production possible year round.

Oryza Shares Press Release: Food Security Summit on Agricultural and Nutrition … – Oryza

Oryza Shares Press Release: Food Security Summit on Agricultural and Nutrition
Oryza
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, Farming First, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific – TheCropSite


TheCropSite

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific
TheCropSite
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific – TheCattleSite


TheCattleSite

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific
TheCattleSite
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …
Summit to Explore Solutions to Asia Pacific Food Security ThePoultrySite.com



all 4 news articles »

Summit to Explore Solutions to Asia Pacific Food Security – ThePoultrySite.com

Summit to Explore Solutions to Asia Pacific Food Security
ThePoultrySite.com
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific – ThePigSite.com

Food Security Summit on Agricultural Solutions in Asia Pacific
ThePigSite.com
… FrieslandCampina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Valmont – Valley Irrigation, Kubota Corporation, Inve Technologies and also influential supporting partners including AgroPages, CropLife Asia, AsianNGO, IRIN, CIAT, World Agroforestry Centre, Switch-Asia and …

You Need to Know: How Climate Change Affects the Food System – Huffington Post

You Need to Know: How Climate Change Affects the Food System
Huffington Post
National Geographic outlines these methods as: "agroforestry, which integrates trees and shrubs into crop and livestock fields; solar-powered drip irrigation, which delivers water directly to plant roots; intercropping, which involves planting two or

and more »

You Need to Know: How Climate Change Affects the Food System – Huffington Post (blog)

You Need to Know: How Climate Change Affects the Food System
Huffington Post (blog)
National Geographic outlines these methods as: "agroforestry, which integrates trees and shrubs into crop and livestock fields; solar-powered drip irrigation, which delivers water directly to plant roots; intercropping, which involves planting two or

and more »

Family Farmers Hold Keys to Agriculture in a Warming World – National Geographic

Family Farmers Hold Keys to Agriculture in a Warming World
National Geographic
Among them: agroforestry, which integrates trees and shrubs into crop and livestock fields; solar-powered drip irrigation, which delivers water directly to plant roots; intercropping, which involves planting two or more crops near each other to

and more »

MAIL TODAY COMMENT: Challenges facing the new government – Daily Mail

MAIL TODAY COMMENT: Challenges facing the new government
Daily Mail
… and efficient tools, keeping in mind the small size of plots of Indian farmers, better roads in rural areas, more crop per drop (drip and micro irrigation), bumping up horticulture, animal husbandry, agro forestry, warehousing, cold storage and

and more »

Landscaping with a function equals permaculture – Tiffin Advertiser Tribune

Landscaping with a function equals permaculture
Tiffin Advertiser Tribune
Choosing beautiful plants that double as a food source. Selecting ground cover that produces fruit. Saving rainwater for irrigation during dry months. Planting herbs in the front yard. These all are part of permaculture, a design system based on

FAO and China mark 40 years of cooperation in hunger fight – Reuters AlertNet

FAO and China mark 40 years of cooperation in hunger fight
Reuters AlertNet
Since 1996, nearly 1,000 Chinese experts have provided support to about 25 other countries through FAO's South-South Cooperation initiative, in areas like irrigation, livestock, fisheries, crop production and agroforestry. This effort was backed up in

and more »

Pome Fruit Weekend Intensive

Title: Pome Fruit Weekend Intensive
Location: Alan Chadwick Garden, UC Santa Cruz
Description: Join us on February 8-9 from 10 am – 4 pm at UCSC’s Alan Chadwick Garden for a weekend devoted to pome fruits (focus on apples and pears).Learn how to select appropriate pome tree varieties and planting sites; choose and use the right tools; prepare the planting hole; plant, fertilize, and prune your trees; set up an irrigation system; and control pests and diseases. Lecture and hands-on format. This workshop will be taught by Chadwick Garden manager Orin Martin assisted by Sky DeMuro and Zoe Hitchner. Registration cost includes Fruit Tree Reader.

$250 general/$225 Friends of the Farm & Garden members/$75 UCSC students. Pre-registration required by Wednesday, February 5. Registration details and online registration site information will be announced here by November 15.
Start Date: 2014-02-08
Start Time: 10:00
End Date: 2014-02-09
End Time: 16:00

Weekend Pome Fruit Intensive

Title: Weekend Pome Fruit Intensive
Location: Alan Chadwick Garden, UC Santa Cruz
Description: Join us on February 8-9 from 10 am – 4 pm at UCSC’s Alan Chadwick Garden for a weekend devoted to pome fruits (focus on apples and pears). Learn how to select appropriate pome tree rootstocks, varieties and planting sites; choose and use the right tools; prepare the planting hole; plant, fertilize, and prune your trees; set up an irrigation system; plant cover crops; and control pests and diseases. Lecture and hands-on format. This workshop will be taught by Chadwick Garden manager Orin Martin assisted by Sky DeMuro and Zoe Hitchner. Cost includes Fruit Tree Reader.
$225 for Friends of the UCSC Farm and Garden/$250 general/$75 UCSC students. Pre-registration required by Wednesday, February 5. Registration details and online registration site will be announced here by November 15.
Start Date: 2013-02-08
Start Time: 10:00
End Date: 2013-02-09
End Time: 16:00

Bali’s Rice-Field Irrigation System Faces Collapse – The Irrawaddy News Magazine

Bali's Rice-Field Irrigation System Faces Collapse
The Irrawaddy News Magazine
“An important development to note here is the preservation not just of the rice terraces but also of the management system,” Meine van Noordwijk, Chief Scientist at the World Agroforestry Center and head of the conference organizing committee, was

Farmer clubs leading way for climate change adaptation in Central India’s semi … – Newstrack India

Farmer clubs leading way for climate change adaptation in Central India's semi
Newstrack India
Farmers receive training on water efficient irrigation practices like drip and sprinkler irrigation, use of drought resistant seed varieties, organic farming, line sowing, dry sowing, agroforestry, horticulture and integrated pest management. Positive

and more »

Rubiales injection license, IFC funding obtained – Oil & Gas Journal

Rubiales injection license, IFC funding obtained
Oil & Gas Journal
Water produced from the existing separation process will be treated through reverse osmosis facilities and used for agroforestry as opposed to being reinjected. The irrigation project is under construction and expected to start up late in this year's
PACIFIC RUBIALES PROVIDES OPERATIONAL UPDATE: Receives Water 4-traders (press release)



all 5 news articles »

PACIFIC RUBIALES PROVIDES OPERATIONAL UPDATE: Receives Water … – 4-traders (press release)

PACIFIC RUBIALES PROVIDES OPERATIONAL UPDATE: Receives Water
4-traders (press release)
At the irrigation project, the water produced from the existing separation process will be treated through reverse osmosis facilities and used for agroforestry, as opposed to being re-injected. The project, which is currently under construction, is

and more »

Pacific Rubiales Provides Operational Update: Receives Water Injection Licence … – PR Newswire (press release)

Pacific Rubiales Provides Operational Update: Receives Water Injection Licence
PR Newswire (press release)
At the irrigation project, the water produced from the existing separation process will be treated through reverse osmosis facilities and used for agroforestry, as opposed to being re-injected. The project, which is currently under construction, is

Pacific Rubiales (TSX:PRE) (bvc:PREC) expects continued strong production … – InvestorIdeas.com (press release)

Pacific Rubiales (TSX:PRE) (bvc:PREC) expects continued strong production
InvestorIdeas.com (press release)
"Cost reductions on incremental produced barrels from the Rubiales and Quifa SW fields are expected from the ongoing water irrigation project, where produced water will be treated through reverse osmosis facilities and used for agroforestry, rather

and more »

Pacific Rubiales expects continued strong production growth and operating … – Canada NewsWire (press release)

Pacific Rubiales expects continued strong production growth and operating
Canada NewsWire (press release)
"Cost reductions on incremental produced barrels from the Rubiales and Quifa SW fields are expected from the ongoing water irrigation project, where produced water will be treated through reverse osmosis facilities and used for agroforestry, rather

and more »

White Cocoa and Crawdads: Supply Chain Resiliency from the Ground Up – Forbes

White Cocoa and Crawdads: Supply Chain Resiliency from the Ground Up
Forbes
Organic cocoa, in contrast, is a low-input, sustainable tree crop requiring minimal irrigation within a lush agroforestry system that includes avocado, banana, citrus and tropical hardwoods, along with food crops like corn and vegetables. Now, thanks

Pacific Rubiales delivers record production , sales volumes , EBITDA and funds … – MarketWatch

Pacific Rubiales delivers record production , sales volumes , EBITDA and funds
MarketWatch
"In order to handle the increasing volumes of water produced in the Rubiales and Quifa fields, the Company has initiated a project to treat produced formation water from these fields and use it for an irrigation project designed for agroforestry

Pacific Rubiales delivers record production, sales volumes, EBITDA and funds … – PR Newswire (press release)

Pacific Rubiales delivers record production, sales volumes, EBITDA and funds
PR Newswire (press release)
"In order to handle the increasing volumes of water produced in the Rubiales and Quifa fields, the Company has initiated a project to treat produced formation water from these fields and use it for an irrigation project designed for agroforestry

and more »

How Food Tank’s Danielle Nierenberg Wants to Save the World – Huffington Post


Huffington Post

How Food Tank's Danielle Nierenberg Wants to Save the World
Huffington Post
Again, most of the investment in agriculture is in sexy technologies and commodity crops and starchy staple crops, and not in the things that are already working — everything from agroforestry and solar drip irrigation to combining "high" and "low

International Center for Biosaline Agriculture, Environment Agency Abu Dhabi … – AME Info (press release)

International Center for Biosaline Agriculture, Environment Agency Abu Dhabi
AME Info (press release)
for crop production; salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants; biosaline agriculture and agroforestry; microbiological interventions for marginal soils; opportunities and challenges in using marginal waters, and soil and water management in irrigated

and more »

ICBA and EAD publish books on soil – Khaleej Times – Khaleej Times

ICBA and EAD publish books on soil – Khaleej Times
Khaleej Times
for crop production; salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants; biosaline agriculture and agroforestry; microbiological interventions for marginal soils; opportunities and challenges in using marginal waters, and soil and water management in irrigated

and more »

ICBA and EAD Publish Two Books On Soil – WAM – Emirates News Agency

ICBA and EAD Publish Two Books On Soil
WAM – Emirates News Agency
for crop production; salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants; biosaline agriculture and agroforestry; microbiological interventions for marginal soils; opportunities and challenges in using marginal waters, and soil and water management in irrigated

2013 Garden Cruz Course Takes Place April 27-28

This spring, immerse yourself in the nuts and bolts of what you need to know to create and maintain afruit tree classhealthy, productive organic garden in a weekend-long “Garden Cruz” course at UC Santa Cruz.

This intensive class will provide a solid foundation to further your lifelong study, enjoyment, and practice of organic gardening. Instructors include Orin Martin, manager of UCSC’s Alan Chadwick Garden and a long-time teacher in the renowned UCSC Farm & Garden Apprenticeship Program, along with local organic farmers Zoe Hitchner and Sky DeMuro of Everett Family Farm.

The 2-day course will be offered Saturday and Sunday, April 27–28. Classes will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The course will cover the basic suite of skills involved in developing a successful organic garden, including soil assessment and bed preparation, composting, planting, irrigation, crop care, harvest, and cover cropping. Each day will include both lectures and hand-on practice, giving participants a chance to get their hands dirty while they learn.

This course is ideal for community members and students involved in campus and community gardens, or looking to enhance their urban homesteading skills.

Classes and hands-on activities will take place at the Alan Chadwick Garden on the UC Santa Cruz campus. Cost of the course is $250, with a $25 discount for Friends of the Farm & Garden members. Active UCSC Docents can register for $175.00. Pre-registration by April 24 is required.

To register online, see http://gardencruz.bpt.me. You can also send a check made payable to “UC Regents” to: Amy Bolton, CASFS/UCSC Farm, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA  95064, attn: Garden Cruz. For additional details, contact Amy Bolton at 831.459-3240, or casfs@ucsc.edu..

Small farmers take the stage to sway climate justice debate – Reuters AlertNet

Small farmers take the stage to sway climate justice debate
Reuters AlertNet
Effective methods – many of them presented by small farmers at the conference – include crop rotation and diversification, agroforestry and underground irrigation, he added. Irish government ministers promised delegates that their views would be

and more »

Pacific Rubiales provides an operational update and reports record production … – Your Oil and Gas News (press release)

Pacific Rubiales provides an operational update and reports record production
Your Oil and Gas News (press release)
Cost reductions on incremental produced barrels from the Rubiales and Quifa fields are expected from the ongoing water irrigation project, where produced water will be treated through reverse osmosis facilities and used for agroforestry, rather than

and more »

Transplanting my potted citrus trees

IMG_6670_ed_lMy two citrus trees, a Mandarin orange and a Meyer lemon, could not stay forever in the half-wine-barrel pots. This year it became clear that it was time to replant them. The orange, in particular, was looking very weak. So, yesterday, after digging a couple of holes in my front yard, a friend came by and we moved them both.

IMG_6671_ed_lIt was an improvised process, but we figured out how to make it work without hurting either the trees or ourselves. Those ancient technologies of the wheel (in this case a wheel barrow) and the inclined plane (a 2×12 plank) came in very handy. Upon discovering that the bottoms of the pots had rotted out, we slid the trees down the plank off my deck, then tilted the barrels on their sides and pulled the trees out. IMG_6674_ed_lTilting the trees back upright onto the plank, we lifted them to the wheelbarrow then slid them off the plank. After wheeling them to the front yard, they slid neatly out of the wheelbarrow into their respective holes. Mission accomplished!

IMG_6675_ed_lTransplanting these two trees marks a watershed moment in my gardening. Up to now, my back yard has been for food production and my front yard a drought-tolerant ornamental garden. For the first time, I have planted a food crop in my front yard. The primary effect of this is that I will now have to begin doing some irrigating in my front yard. With these trees making a beachhead for food crops, I have to wonder: Will I soon be growing other food crops in my front yard?IMG_6676_ed_lIMG_6677_ed_lIMG_6679_ed_l

Pacific Rubiales provides an operational update and reports record production … – Canada NewsWire (press release)

Pacific Rubiales provides an operational update and reports record production
Canada NewsWire (press release)
Cost reductions on incremental produced barrels from the Rubiales and Quifa fields are expected from the ongoing water irrigation project, where produced water will be treated through reverse osmosis facilities and used for agroforestry, rather than

and more »

Historic Hay Barn to Be Restored

UCSC has received a $5 million cornerstone pledge from Alec and Claudia Webster, representing the Helen and Will Webster Foundation, that will help restore the historic Cowell Ranch Hay Barn near the campus’s main entrance. The restored site will serve as a new home for the Center for Agroecology & Sustainable Food Systems (CASFS), Life Lab, and other south campus sustainability groups, as well as a welcoming new “front door” to the UCSC Farm and south campus area.

See the related press release for details of the Hay Barn restoration effort and this generous gift.

The Webster Foundation pledge will be awarded over several years, with the majority of the funds targeted for the Hay Barn’s reconstruction and outfitting for multiple uses, including offices, classrooms, and exhibit space.

According to Daniel Press, executive director of CASFS, the restoration effort demonstrates the campus’s commitment to its historic infrastructure and to its long history as a working landscape. “Front doors are important to people,” says Press, “This restored portion of UCSC’s entrance, with its focus on CASFS and other environmental programs, will signal to students and visitors both the campus’s respect for its past and its commitment to a sustainable future.”

The restored Hay Barn will create a focal point for CASFS student, apprenticeship and community activities and a welcoming gateway to campus and the UCSC Farm. The restored site will also make it possible for CASFS to expand its outreach and extension work with local growers, with plans for a new classroom space to accommodate groups of up to 75 for short courses and workshops.

Plans for related improvements to the site include a new produce pick up area for the UCSC Farm’s Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program and visitor parking that will improve access to the farm. A portion of the gift will support CASFS and Environmental Studies programs in the future.

In a related project, a new three-acre field is currently being brought into production and will permanently expand the UCSC Farm’s boundary to the edge of renovated Hay Barn, making the Farm easily visible to students and visitors as they enter campus. Fundraising is now underway to purchase and install the fencing, irrigation, and other infrastructure needed for this expansion of farming activities.

‘Focus on projects sanctioned under Bundelkhand package’ – Daily Pioneer

'Focus on projects sanctioned under Bundelkhand package'
Daily Pioneer
Following discussion on irrigation among priorities, the Chief Minister directed to give priority to animal husbandry and related activities and agro forestry. He said that horticulture is a sector which increases income at a rapid pace. He directed to

Madhya Pradesh CM Chouhan fixes priorities for 12th Plan – India Education Diary

Madhya Pradesh CM Chouhan fixes priorities for 12th Plan
India Education Diary
Following discussion on irrigation among priorities, the Chief Minister directed to give priority to animal husbandry and related activities and agro forestry. He said that horticulture is a sector which increases income at a rapid pace. He directed to

IISD Publishes Reports on Adaptation Strategies in the Dominican Republic … – IISD Reporting Services

IISD Publishes Reports on Adaptation Strategies in the Dominican Republic
IISD Reporting Services
The report recommends CRM strategies, including: building water reservoirs; climate-proofing access roads; implementing agroforestry systems; promoting reforestation through payment for ecosystem services (PES) systems; increasing irrigation efficiency

AgroEco® Coffee Tour | Day 6 Highlights

Posted in: News   Topics: Action Education, Coffee, Events,


Day 6 Highlights:
The first five days of the AgroEco® Coffee Tour we explored what’s behind our cup of coffee: we connected with the farmers who grow the coffee we drink and followed the processing of the beans from harvest to export. During this time, we saw how dependent the farmers are on the income they earn from the sale of the coffee they grow — at the expense of their families for they grew very little of the food they need to sustain themselves. In fact, the farm families at Denis Guiterrez, like coffee farmers throughout Latin America, do not have enough food to eat for the three months prior to the next harvest. Typically, this is the time when all of the harvest money has been spent.

On our last day in the coffee growing region of San Ramón, we visited Ramon Garcia Cooperative, another farmer cooperative of the Union of Agricultural Cooperatives in San Ramón (UCA). We explored how CAN, in partnership with UCA, is collaborating with farmers to produce more food for their own and local consumption.  Here, with funding from Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, CAN and the UCA have been working in collaboration with the farmers on food security and sovereignty projects. Through these projects, families will grow a diversity of produce for their own use. Here the president and vice-president of the cooperative and the youth leader of the project, Juan Pablo, greeted us. They, along with several families, showed us around the cooperative.

Juan Pablo explained that over the past two years he has been working with families in his cooperative to establish large gardens with technical assistance from the UCA. Their work has included installing a manually operated irrigation system and creating composting and vermicomposting systems. Juan Pablo’s own garden serves as a model where he conducts various experiments for the farmers to observe. Here we saw an innovative drip-irrigation system made of a recycled plastic bottle and corn-cob stopper with water dripping through it.

We were amazed at gardens, which included trellises of passion fruit to be sold on the local market, tomatoes, squashes, herbs, carrots, papaya, citrus, and other fruit trees. We were not only struck by the diversity of foods being grown, but also the beauty of the gardens and the joy of the families in sharing their gardens with us. This is a new venture for Ramon Garcia and one that will expand to Denis Gutierrez and other cooperatives of the UCA in the year ahead.

In the evening, we celebrated with our guides and friends from the UCA as we reflected on the people we connected with and the experiences that we shared — bringing together the people who farm the coffee and the people who drink it.

 

Several projects set for Kalabugao Plain – Philippine Information Agency

Several projects set for Kalabugao Plain
Philippine Information Agency
One is the economic sector where livelihood, organic agriculture production, agro forestry, irrigation canal, animal dispersal, fisheries or fishponds among others, are seen to provide sustainable income to community members. Second is the environment

Sierra Leone, Vietnam strengthen South-South Cooperation through agriculture – Sierra Express Media


Sierra Express Media

Sierra Leone, Vietnam strengthen South-South Cooperation through agriculture
Sierra Express Media
Broader areas that were discussed included, but not limited to; water control, irrigation, crop intensification and diversification and agro-forestry. This recent visit will continue to strengthen the bilateral and multilateral ties between the two

and more »

Sierra Leone, Viet Nam strengthen South-South Cooperation through agriculture – Sierra Express Media


Sierra Express Media

Sierra Leone, Viet Nam strengthen South-South Cooperation through agriculture
Sierra Express Media
Broader areas that were discussed included, but not limited to; water control, irrigation, crop intensification and diversification and agro-forestry. This recent visit will continue to strengthen the bilateral and multilateral ties between the two

and more »

CASFS Hiring Farm Site and Research Lands Manager

CASFS is hiring a Farm Site and Research Lands Manager to join a team of experienced farmers and

research field

Research trial at the UCSC Farm.

gardeners running the CASFS Farm and Garden Apprenticeship Program, assuming primary responsibility for new farm sites at CASFS (the Hay Barn and Lower Quarry Fields) and research trials. The Farm Site and Research Lands Manager will assist other site managers with tillage and cultivation systems, irrigation infrastructure and function, ecological stewardship of the overall 30-acre farm site, vehicle and tractor maintenance, building maintenance, compliance with third-party organic certification, state and county regulations as well as health and safety regulations. The Farm Site and Research Lands Manager will be supervised by the Executive Director of CASFS.

View the full job description and access the online application. Initial review of applications begins February 10.


New 3-day Organic Fruit Tree Short Course Offered February 8-10

If you’re ready to immerse yourself in the art and science of organic fruit tree growing, this class is for you! This comprehensive course will give you the tools you need to successfully cultivate fruit trees on a backyard or small-orchard scale. The course takes place February 8-10 at the historic Alan Chadwick Garden on the UC Santa Cruz campus. Friday’s class meets from 5-7:30 pm, Saturday and Sunday sessions meet from 10 am – 4pm.

Online and mail-in registration details here.

Through lectures and hands-on practice you’ll learn how to select appropriate fruit tree varieties; choose and use the right tools; prepare the planting hole; plant, fertilize, and prune your trees; set up an irrigation system; improve the soil with cover crops; and control pests and diseases. Registration cost includes the Fruit Tree Reader, a selection of articles designed for this course.

The course will be taught by Orin Martin, manager of the Alan Chadwick Garden at UC Santa Cruz. For over 35 years Martin has cultivated hundreds of organic fruit trees at the Chadwick Garden, and taught thousands of students and community members how to establish and care for fruit trees. Zoe Hitchner and Sky DeMuro, organic farmers at Everett Family Farm, will be co-instructors. Class size is limited to ensure a quality experience, with an emphasis on hands-on learning.

3-day Fruit Tree Intensive Workshop

Title: 3-day Fruit Tree Intensive Workshop
Location: Alan Chadwick Garden, UC Santa Cruz
Link out: Click here
Description: If you’re ready to immerse yourself in the art and science of fruit tree growing, this class is for you! Taught by Alan Chadwick Garden manager Orin Martn with Sky DeMuro and Zoe Hitchner of Everett Family Farm, this 3-day in-depth course will cover the spectrum of what you need to know to successfully grow fruit trees on a backyard and small orchard scale. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on practice you’ll learn how to select appropriate varieties; choose and use the right tools; prepare the planting hole; plant, fertilize, and prune your trees; set up an irrigation system; improve the soil with cover crops; and control pests and diseases. A Fruit Tree Primer of selected readings is included in the course fee.
Class size is limited to ensure a high quality experience, with an emphasis on hands-on learning. The Friday introduction and lecture will take place from 4:30–6:30 pm; Saturday and Sunday sessions are from 10 am–4 pm.
Cost of the 3-day course is $275 for Friends of the Farm & Garden members, $300 general admission. Pre-registration is required. To register, send a check made payable to “UC Regents” to: Amy Bolton, CASFS/UCSC Farm, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064. For online registration, see http://fruittree.brownpapertickets.com (note that a service fee applies to online registrations). Questions? Email casfs@ucsc.edu or call 831.459-3240. Rainout dates = February 15–17.
Start Date: 2013-02-08
End Date: 2013-02-10

Irrigating with rainwater in a Mediterranean climate

IMG_20121205_164919It’s a common belief that using rainwater for irrigation in a Mediterranean climate is not practical, because most rains come in the winter and most usage comes in the dry summer. The argument is essentially that you can’t store enough water to irrigate for an entire summer. While this weather pattern is a problem, it doesn’t mean you can’t–or shouldn’t–use rainwater to irrigate. Following are some thoughts on rainwater for irrigation in the Bay Area’s Mediterranean climate as well as my experience for the year Oct 2011 – Sep 2012.

Four factors mitigate the problem from a seasonal rainfall pattern:

  1. There is some overlap of the rainwater collection period and the irrigation period. That is, in warm spring weather, especially with newly planted crops, some irrigation is necessary. But, some rains also come during the spring. So, you can be using stored water during the same period you are using it. What this means is that you don’t need to have storage capacity equal to all of the irrigation water you will use during the year. You can get by with considerably less, as my data below show
  2. The benefits of rainwater collection can be obtained from partial irrigation with rainwater. Any rainwater saved for irrigation is water not sourced from regular sources, and thus a savings. Even if only 25% of irrigation water for a year comes from rainwater, the savings in water and energy used to pump or transport water is saved. It’s not an all-or-nothing proposition.
  3. Urban farmers are likely to be more efficient with water than large-scale rural farmers. In addition, it’s easy for urban farmers to collect and store rainwater. Residential roofs will collect much more rainwater than can be stored. Thus, demand can be lower and supply higher in an urban area.
  4. In a sense, the problem is being able to store sufficient water given the supply. This is being made easier by newer designs of storage containers, as shown in the photograph above. The containers shown each have up to 300 gallons capacity, yet have a footprint only two-feet deep, making them ideal to sit next to a house under an eave. Here they are next to my house but do not block my neighbors driveway. Earlier rainwater storage tanks were typically round and difficult to find room for, especially if they had a large capacity.  See a previous post here, with photos of my four 65-gallon barrels, ie, a similar capacity as the 300-gallon tanks shown, but with a much larger footprint. The eight garbage cans, again with the same amount of storage, take up an even larger footprint.

For the year Oct 2011 – Sep 2012, I had four 65-gallon rainwater collection barrels, plus eight garbage cans for secondary storage, which doubled my capacity to 520 gallons. I bumped this up somewhat with a dozen or so 5-gallon buckets, bringing my total storage to about 600 gallons. During this period, however, I used a total of 971 gallons of rainwater for irrigation. We had a warm spell from January to March, during which I used irrigated exclusively using rainwater. We then had a series of storms in April and May, during which I topped off my storage containers. So, this overlap period in which I both irrigated with and collected rainwater increased my actual usage of rainwater by more than 50% over my actual storage capacity.

In total, I used 1611 gallons of water for irrigation during the year. Thus, 60% of my irrigation was with rainwater. I irrigated exclusively with rainwater from October through June. The warmer months of July through September were with city water.

I have now doubled my storage capacity, to slightly over 1000 gallons. I believe with this total capacity, I may be able to irrigate my garden exclusively with rainwater this year. The experiment continues….

Fruit Trees 101: Basic Fruit Tree Care

Title: Fruit Trees 101: Basic Fruit Tree Care
Location: Louise Cain Gatehouse, UCSC Farm
Description: On Saturday, January 5 from 10 am – 1 pm learn the basics of fruit tree planting, irrigation, fertility, pest management, and winter pruning. Orchard Care founder Matthew Sutton will lead this workshop. Wear warm clothes and bring a snack; heavy rain cancels. $20 for Friends of the Farm & Garden members, $30 for general public, $5 for UCSC students, payable the day of the workshop. Note: a workshops that focuses on winter pruning will be offered on February 9 at the UCSC Farm. For more information, contact 831.459-3240 or casfs@ucsc.edu.
Rainout = Saturday, January 12

Start Time: 10:00
Date: 2013-01-05
End Time: 13:00

Rio+ has come and gone… Now what?

The 2012 Earth Summit has come to a close. This campaign lives on.

The Outcome Document, “The Future We Want”, hasn’t brought us any closer to any implementation of public policies to actively promote and support sustainable agriculture.

Its chapter on “Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture” lists what needs to happen but fails to define “sustainable agriculture”, and doesn’t include any sort of commitment with regard to agricultural policies:

Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture

108. We reaffirm our commitments regarding the right of everyone to have access
to safe, sufficient and nutritious food, consistent with the right to adequate food and
the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger. We acknowledge that
food security and nutrition has become a pressing global challenge and, in this
regard, we further reaffirm our commitment to enhancing food security and access
to adequate, safe and nutritious food for present and future generations in line with
the Five Rome Principles for Sustainable Global Food Security adopted in 2009,
including for children under two, and through, as appropriate, national, regional and
global food security and nutrition strategies.

109. We recognize that a significant portion of the world’s poor live in rural areas,
and that rural communities play an important role in the economic development of
many countries. We emphasize the need to revitalize the agricultural and rural
development sectors, notably in developing countries, in an economically, socially
and environmentally sustainable manner. We recognize the importance of taking the
necessary actions to better address the needs of rural communities through, inter
alia, enhancing access by agricultural producers, in particular small producers,
women, indigenous peoples and people living in vulnerable situations, to credit and
other financial services, markets, secure land tenure, health care, social services,
education, training, knowledge and appropriate and affordable technologies,
including for efficient irrigation, reuse of treated wastewater and water harvesting
and storage. We reiterate the importance of empowering rural women as critical
agents for enhancing agricultural and rural development and food security and
nutrition. We also recognize the importance of traditional sustainable agricultural
practices, including traditional seed supply systems, including for many indigenous
peoples and local communities.

110. Noting the diversity of agricultural conditions and systems, we resolve to
increase sustainable agricultural production and productivity globally, including
through improving the functioning of markets and trading systems and strengthening
international cooperation, particularly for developing countries, by increasing public
and private investment in sustainable agriculture, land management and rural
development. Key areas for investment and support include sustainable agricultural
practices; rural infrastructure, storage capacities and related technologies; research
and development on sustainable agricultural technologies; developing strong
agricultural cooperatives and value chains; and strengthening urban-rural linkages.
We also recognize the need to significantly reduce post-harvest and other food
losses and waste throughout the food supply chain.

111. We reaffirm the necessity to promote, enhance and support more sustainable
agriculture, including crops, livestock, forestry, fisheries and aquaculture, that
improves food security, eradicates hunger and is economically viable, while
conserving land, water, plant and animal genetic resources, biodiversity and
ecosystems and enhancing resilience to climate change and natural disasters. We
also recognize the need to maintain natural ecological processes that support food
production systems.

112. We stress the need to enhance sustainable livestock production systems,
including through improving pasture land and irrigation schemes in line with
national policies, legislation, rules and regulations, enhanced sustainable water
management systems, and efforts to eradicate and prevent the spread of animal
diseases, recognizing that the livelihoods of farmers, including pastoralists, and the
health of livestock are intertwined.

113. We also stress the crucial role of healthy marine ecosystems, sustainable
fisheries and sustainable aquaculture for food security and nutrition and in providing
for the livelihoods of millions of people.

114. We resolve to take action to enhance agricultural research, extension services,
training and education to improve agricultural productivity and sustainability
through the voluntary sharing of knowledge and good practices. We further resolve
to improve access to information, technical knowledge and know-how, including
through new information and communications technologies that empower farmers,
fisherfolk and foresters to choose among diverse methods of achieving sustainable
agricultural production. We call for the strengthening of international cooperation on
agricultural research for development.

115. We reaffirm the important work and inclusive nature of the Committee on
World Food Security, including through its role in facilitating country-initiated
assessments on sustainable food production and food security, and we encourage
countries to give due consideration to implementing the Committee on World Food
Security Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land,
Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security. We take note of the
ongoing discussions on responsible agricultural investment in the framework of the
Committee on World Food Security, as well as the principles for responsible
agricultural investment.

116. We stress the need to address the root causes of excessive food price volatility,
including its structural causes, at all levels, and the need to manage the risks linked
to high and excessively volatile prices in agricultural commodities and their
consequences for global food security and nutrition, as well as for smallholder
farmers and poor urban dwellers.

117. We underline the importance of timely, accurate and transparent information in
helping to address excessive food price volatility, and in this regard take note of the
Agricultural Market Information System hosted by the Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and urge the participating international
organizations, private sector actors and Governments to ensure the public
dissemination of timely and quality food market information products.

118. We reaffirm that a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and
equitable multilateral trading system will promote agricultural and rural
development in developing countries and contribute to world food security. We urge
national, regional and international strategies to promote the participation of
farmers, especially smallholder farmers, including women, in community, domestic,
regional and international markets.

More than ever, now is the time to hold the feet of policy makers to the fire. We have gathered thousands of signatures in the US thanks to Change.org, Care2.com and our partner SlowFood USA. The European campaign has rallied a dozen organizations.

We rely on you to help us keep this campaign alive, and to grow the movement. As Rio+20 has demonstrated, fertile ground for change is to be found in the energy and resources of civil society.

Please share the word about the petitions, sign up for blog updates about this campaign and related issues, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook. We’re only getting started.

Rain water and earthquakes

My deck, tilted down in the corner.A few weeks ago, I moved rainwater from my catchment barrels to secondary storage–some new garbage cans on my deck. I’ve been storing rainwater this way on my deck for a couple years, now, but these were new barrels in a new location. Apparently, that part of my deck, right next to the house, wasn’t as well supported underneath as the other place. When I first put the water there, there was no problem. But, a few days later we had an earthquake. The next day I noticed a marked tilt to my deck. Live and learn! Four garbage cans of water weight slightly over one-half ton. The combination of that weight and an earthquake has left me with a new project–repairing my deck! The water has now been moved to a new location, on solid earth.

In other good news, this weeks storms have refilled my catchment rain barrels and every five gallon bucket I own. I’m now at my total capacity of over 600 gallons of water. I’m very curious to see how far this amount of water will get me into the summer as I irrigate my garden.

Water for my garden!

Rain gauge at 2.5 inches from yesterday's storm.

Rain gauge at 2.5 inches from yesterday's storm.

That was a nice storm yesterday, the first good one since early October, if I’m not mistaken. I’ve been watering my winter crops with rainwater from that early storm, using about 200 gallons so far. It’s unusual to need to irrigate in the winter, but I’m glad I’ve got my rainwater collection system.

Yesterday’s storm (with a few drops from Thursday) totaled nearly 2.5 inches. That was enough to completely fill my rain barrels, giving me another 260 gallons of water for irrigation.

A side note about the rain gauge: I put this up a month ago, as part of dealing with leftovers from my parents’ home. This was a Christmas gift to my dad many years ago and I’m happy to provide it a new home. It took me a while to figure out where to put it, since I didn’t want it to be “influenced” by trees or buildings. The only good place I found is on my grape trellis I installed in 2010. Now, it’s very accessible and a welcome addition to my garden.